Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
golfingnooob

Playing golf in a thunderstorm?

22 posts in this topic

What if you're playing a round of golf and it stards raining with thunder and lightning?

Surely carrying around metal golf clubs isn't safe?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sign up (or log in) today! It's free (and you won't see this ad anymore)!

Sign up (or log in) today! It's free (and you won't see this ad anymore)!

No, it is not.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by golfingnooob

What if you're playing a round of golf and it stards raining with thunder and lightning?

Surely carrying around metal golf clubs isn't safe?

You get to shelter as soon as possible. Golf clubs make for great lightning rods, as do you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by Zeph

No, it is not.


I know this thread might seem strangely random, but we've been having some thunderstorms lately and I wanted to go and play. Just wondering what you're supposed to do? Just drop your clubs and step away from them, or grab them and run inside or something?

Always best to be prepared imo

Has it ever happened to anyone here, or do they know of it happening?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by golfingnooob

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zeph

No, it is not.

I know this thread might seem strangely random, but we've been having some thunderstorms lately and I wanted to go and play. Just wondering what you're supposed to do? Just drop your clubs and step away from them, or grab them and run inside or something?

Always best to be prepared imo

Has it ever happened to anyone here, or do they know of it happening?

I don't think carrying your clubs will make you more of a target than you already are. Lightning typically goes for the highest point, which would be the top of your head. Just dropping your clubs and stepping away will not necessarily make you safe. Best thing to do is high-tail it to the nearest shelter.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Happens all the time here. Enough so that some courses monitor local radar all day during monsoon season. My experience is they will call you off the course with an air horn long before the danger is close. But it really depends on what the storm is doing. Last Sat we played late afternoon and the forecast was clear. By the time we got to the course some dark clouds had rolled in. We heard thunder in the distance and there were a few light showers but never any lightning until the end of the round. I was on 17 at the time and the wind started blowing hard so we bee lined back to the shop, I blazed right past the slow old folks in front of us who elected to try and finish 18.

In just the time it took to get from the 18 tee to the clubhouse everyone on the course was either in front of the club house or in the process of bailing out. The pro shop lost power so the PA was inop. Pretty scary stuff. More than the lightning it would have been crazy to be out there in the wind, funnel clouds were spotted in the area. That storm moved too fast to call people in and they don't use radar there, the Sat afternoon staff is just kids. In the time it took me to drive home 7 miles south it was over and it was sunny again.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Get some graphite shafts and a rubber hat.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

There aren't too many things that will chase me off a golf course, but lightening is one of them!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Never golf when there is lightning in the area!

Lightning usually arrives before the rain..........dead golfers are rarely wet..............

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this is a dumb question, then just remember I come from southern California where it doesn't rain ... and you can forget about thunderstorms.

If a lightning storm breaks out "all of a sudden" then would you be better off high-tailing it to shelter, perhaps across a few open fairways if you are far from the clubhouse, or would it be better to "hide" under a tree?

(Our version of this would be whether or not to bust ass outside when the earthquake hits, or if you aren't near an opening, just get in a doorway) :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I am a golf course supt. if i hear thunder or see a cell coming I get my guys off the course asap. raking a bunker or mowing a fairway isnt worth dying for. the marshalls will sound air horns for the golfer but sadly some wont heed the warning.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by wils5150

I am a golf course supt. if i hear thunder or see a cell coming I get my guys off the course asap. raking a bunker or mowing a fairway isnt worth dying for. the marshalls will sound air horns for the golfer but sadly some wont heed the warning.

The bad thing is that I can't hear the thunder when I'm on the tractor and many times I'm the only one there.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What if you're playing a round of golf and it stards raining with thunder and lightning? Surely carrying around metal golf clubs isn't safe?

Yesterday there was a huge storm coming in, it was about twenty minutes away and I had five holes left. I was walking, and am a really quick player. It was pitch black to the northwest, but I was five under par; I had to try and finish. But there whet these two guys that could not even hit the golf ball, and where really stuck up and wouldn't let be pass. I makes my ball in 15 fairway and literally out ran the storm. When I got in the club house the storm hit, the wind was almost lifting the carts, and there was lightning real close. The two guys ahead of me where still playing golf

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by MS256

The bad thing is that I can't hear the thunder when I'm on the tractor and many times I'm the only one there.


I know how that goes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly the best thing to do is hold your 1 iron in the air.  Even God can't hit a 1 iron.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by wils5150

I am a golf course supt. if i hear thunder or see a cell coming I get my guys off the course asap. raking a bunker or mowing a fairway isnt worth dying for. the marshalls will sound air horns for the golfer but sadly some wont heed the warning.

I was an assistant superintendent, and if I could hear thunder I would get all the guys off the course, also. That is the way I do it when I play. It always blows my mind when players stay on the course too long.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When my dad was younger, he was playing with his buddies and the horn blew for lightning. They went in a shack that had a lightning rod near it going into the ground. Lightning struck it and everybody was thrown out of the shack but they were okay.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by Golfingdad

If this is a dumb question, then just remember I come from southern California where it doesn't rain ... and you can forget about thunderstorms.

If a lightning storm breaks out "all of a sudden" then would you be better off high-tailing it to shelter, perhaps across a few open fairways if you are far from the clubhouse, or would it be better to "hide" under a tree?

(Our version of this would be whether or not to bust ass outside when the earthquake hits, or if you aren't near an opening, just get in a doorway) :)

Most courses here highlight the shelters on the course by marking it on the scorecard diagram. It's no mistake more often than not that shelter is the head, if they built a brick building. That's how you can tell if you're on an older course. The latter usually has a pavilion on each side, rod on top with copper ground, some sheds divided into quarters to offer four sides of protection. You pass the structures as you make your way around.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Advertisement
Advertisement


  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2017 TST Partners

    PING Golf
    Leupold Golf
    Snell Golf
    Talamore Golf Resort
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Posts

    • Thanks for your questions Swede. Regarding data for irons, if I understand what you are asking, the driver data can't really be correlated. Each iron would have it's own ideal launch conditions (launch angle, spin rate, ball speed) which would be based off of the player's swing speed.  The ball is designed to perform differently with longer clubs than shorter clubs, but if you can get dialed in with your driver, you'll be pretty close with the rest of the set also. The driver/shaft combo certainly affects the trajectory as well, and sometimes guys are playing the wrong ball and the wrong driver.  But what I see more often is a player who goes through the fitting process when purchasing a driver and irons, then they play whatever ball happens to be on sale.  It would be like using a different driver every time they played!  When trying to optimize trajectory, the ball is a good place to start.  Why buy a new driver when moving to a different ball can make the difference?  Sometimes the ball will help some, but to get where a player needs to be a different shaft or driver might be needed also. A lot of guys will go through a ball fitting whenever they get a new driver, which is not a bad idea.  Usually, if your previous driver fit properly and the new one fits properly, the ball will work just fine.  I usually suggest going through a ball fitting at least every-other-season just to make sure.  Sometimes our swings evolve...maybe your swing has improved or swing speed has increased, or it could be the other way, but it's good to make sure your stuff is correct.
    • To be clear, I have never talked about "the Titleist fitting." I don't know what they do to fit players. I'm simply talking about their recommendation to start at the green and work backward, but ultimately to consider all the shots you play in a round of golf, not just ones with the driver. I'm not talking about "here's two balls, try them out." I'm talking about the idea of "here are 30 kinds of golf ball. I eliminated a few because they felt horrible off my putter. I eliminated a few more for poor performance around the green. I eliminated some more for poor spin or flight with my irons. Of the six that I had left, these two performed well with my driver, so one of them is a good fit. If they have a super official "ball fitting" process, I wasn't talking about that, nor was I talking about a "here is a Pro V1 and a Pro V1x… hit some shots and pick one." So… I wish you hadn't devoted that much attention to the "Titleist method" in your post when that's not at all what I was asking. My point was… I'm skeptical that the Bridgestone method (only hitting a few balls, not doing much to account for consistent tee heights, ball position, players getting "warmed up" during the process, etc., only using the driver and disregarding the rest of the shots) is a great method, either.
    • 1. Golf is elitist. So far from true but I still get way too many people who chuckle at my interest in golf- as if I should be embarrassed that I enjoy such a snobby pastime.  2. Just swing your swing- and stop obsessing about getting a "pretty" swing. Sorry, but that's not sound advice - when I get rid of the key elements that are holding me back, yes, sure- then I'll make the most of what I've got. I'll swing that swing. Until then, not a chance, now that I have learned about the fundamentals . There's work to be done to make my future golf far more enjoyable and competitive.   3. Lessons are expensive. Nope- look hard enough and you can find quality swing guidance at a reasonable price.  I agree with lotsa others above but these resonate for me at my level of play right and interactions with people now. 
    • Let me address the things you mentioned and clarify a little bit, because I think there is some misconceptions on some of the aspects. There is perception that the Titleist fitting covers everything and the Bridgestone only addresses the driver.  One of the biggest issues I have with the Titleist method is it's not a real golf ball fitting.  They give you a Pro V1 2-ball pack and a Pro V1x 2-ball pack and basically tell you to hit some shots and see which one you like best. So regardless of swing speed, handicap, launch numbers or anything else, they are saying you can pick this ball or that ball.  The other models in Titleist's line are not included and competitor models are not included.  I know for a fact that there are many players who don't fit into either of those models, but Titleist doesn't offer other options or comparisons.  They claim the Pro V1 and Pro V1x have the best distance, best short game spin, best flight characteristics, softest feel and great durability.  I hate to tell everyone, but there is no such thing as a perfect golf ball.  The laws of physics and aerodynamics apply to Titleist just like everyone else.  A ball that is designed for high spin will not be as long as a lower spinning model and will tend to curve more, and a ball designed for distance will not have the same type of performance on approach shots and around the green. Titleist also doesn't offer any data that shows how those models stack-up for players, or how they perform compared to their ideal numbers.  Sure, people love the spin that they get around the green, but do they need that much spin?  Is all that spin hurting them in other areas?  High spin actually gets a lot of players in trouble and costs them more strokes than it saves them.  Similar to the Titleist method that has players go through the process on their own, after a Bridgestone tech works with a player and their driver and shows them the data, a 2-ball pack is given to the player to continue their testing on the course with irons and short game.  As far as the number of shots on the launch monitor is concerned, you are correct...typically 3 or 4 shots with each ball is recorded.  It's not a lot, but it's 6-8 more shots over a launch monitor than a Titleist fitting. Obviously it would be great to do more, but a fitting could easily stretch to an hour per player, so a typical 4-5 hour event we could only help a handful of players.  A normal fitting takes about 15 min, so that is 16-20 players per event.  At that number, the cost of each fitting was right around $40/player.  If an hour was spent with each player, it would cost almost $200/player which isn't cost effective. On the launch angle issue, what I said was there are many things that can affect the launch, including the ball.  I didn't say 2* wasn't possible and I didn't say in the example I posted that only 1/2* could be attributed to the ball.  Honestly, I can't say how much of that 2* is related to moving to a different model...even if other variables like tee height, ball position were removed, the difference in loft will vary from player-to-player due to different swing speeds, swing paths, angle of attack etc which is unique to everyone.  Plus depending on what model is used first and which model is recommended could have a smaller or larger affect than other combinations.  You could probably make the same case for every category if you wanted though, right?  You could say how much of the difference in spin was caused by the ball change and how much was the result of some other variable?  Spin is more important than the launch angle, so even if the l.a. stayed the same, the drop in spin would have made a nice difference by itself.  But we know the player was launching the ball too low with too much spin, a lower spinning/higher launching ball was recommended and the results were a more efficient trajectory and an increase in performance. I believe the key is to be able to show a player in black and white what their launch conditions are with their current ball and how it compares to their ideal numbers.  If you can't show a player the areas that need improvement, then how can you confidently recommend the best ball for them?  The truth is, most people are playing the wrong ball, so it's not that hard to make an improvement, and honestly there are probably a handful of different makes/models that would be better.    
    • 1-5. Putting matters most. Uh huh. What are the chances I gain 2 strokes because I (or just about any golfer) 4 putted? It's happened. Rarely. What are the chances I (or just about any golfer) hit an errant tee shot and blow 2 strokes? 40% every tee shot for me. 
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Blog Entries

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Dragondrake
      Dragondrake
      (57 years old)
    2. Mistabigevil
      Mistabigevil
      (36 years old)
    3. Taylor56
      Taylor56
      (61 years old)
  • Get Great Gear with Amazon