Jump to content
iacas

AMA Thread (@iacas)

203 posts / 51546 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, Abu3baid said:

Have you ever played Dave or Mike for money or bragging rights?  Which side of the fence are you usually on when/if you do?

Dave's the better player. I mean, he had Web.com Tour status for awhile, after all.

But I've gotten the better of him the last several times out. I want to say… three times in a row now he's been defeated? Two of them were with partners, though his team still should have won. The last one I beat him straight up. I also beat him at about four or five putting matches in a row before he evened that up. We've been 50/50 in the four matches since, IIRC. Or if we've played two since, he's 2-1. At one point, over 28 holes (I won the first 18 holes, and we played nine more that went to an extra hole), I was putting at 46%. From 20-30 feet. I made 13 of the 28 putts. He was something like 8 under par (all par twos) in 28 holes and he never sniffed victory.

But, overall, Dave beats me by one to three a side, usually. Then again, he is older than I am, so maybe he's starting to fall off… ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

What was the biggest change for you last year in terms of golf learning?  Was there anything that totally shifted the way you understood how to play/learn/practice/score from how you did things in Jan 2015?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, ZappyAd said:

What was the biggest change for you last year in terms of golf learning?  Was there anything that totally shifted the way you understood how to play/learn/practice/score from how you did things in Jan 2015?

I'll try to answer your question, but it feels like you think something big changed from last year to this year. Very little happened - LSW was written the winter before, and came out in June of 2014. I've been a PGA apprentice for four or five years or whatever, now. I've been teaching golf for that same amount of time. Last year we did teach during the summer (usually our slower time of the year) at Chautauqua Golf Club, so that was interesting. We spoke during the PGA Show at the "Open Forum" on statistics and scoring. We've continued to train instructors in 5SK, and are now this year going to introduce an LSW class for local instructors to teach.

Nothing big really changed. We've had FlightScopes for years. We've had our SwingCatalyst for years. Even Analyzr 2.0 came out in 2014, so I can't say that did anything. :-)

I feel as though I just continued to take continual, evolutionary little steps toward knowing more and being better. Understanding more. Communicating better. That sort of thing. I don't think there's really some great discovery out there to be had, some great unknown thing that we'll unearth. Despite what people who spent gobs of money on a GEARS will try to tell you… :-D

Unless, of course, you meant something else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Hi Erik,

     The 5 keys deal with the physical golf swing, and LSW deals with planning, what to focus on, and how to put together a strategy for playing a round of golf.    Do you have any thoughts on what the best way to approach the game is from the mental side of things, and what are some key things that many people who are good at the game have that makes them more likely to win from what goes through their head, or their mindset?

There are some things like that in LSW, the "go-for-it" statistic and how players will statistically score better when they "go for it" over time.   But what are your thoughts on how someone should mentally prepare for a round of golf, notably a club tournament or something that is important to them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

18 minutes ago, imsys0042 said:

The 5 keys deal with the physical golf swing, and LSW deals with planning, what to focus on, and how to put together a strategy for playing a round of golf.    Do you have any thoughts on what the best way to approach the game is from the mental side of things, and what are some key things that many people who are good at the game have that makes them more likely to win from what goes through their head, or their mindset?

There are some things like that in LSW, the "go-for-it" statistic and how players will statistically score better when they "go for it" over time.   But what are your thoughts on how someone should mentally prepare for a round of golf, notably a club tournament or something that is important to them?

I think LSW deals a bit with the mental side in terms of GamePlanning, but as for what you're really asking, yeah, I agree that saying "LSW covers it" is a cop-out as much as you do.

Look, frankly, I don't know what to tell people about the mental game. My own mental game has always been pretty good. Even when I get down on myself I use that to spur me on. Other times I get cocky, and use that to spur me on. At the end of the day I realize that golf is a game, I relish putting myself into pressure situations with the easy out that, at the end of the day, I'm still the same person, but at the same time wouldn't it feel great to accomplish something, to push myself? Basically, I feel like I don't let the fear enter into things.

So, in my opinion, I've always been pretty good about the mental game, so it's tough to answer the question because it's like me telling someone how to stop smoking: I'd be likely to tell them "Just stop. Duh." Because I don't understand what it's like to be addicted to cigarettes. Or drinking. Or gambling.

I don't know what it's like to be fearful of hitting a golf shot. Or to need to prepare for something. At the end of the day, it's just a game. So I have a hard time understanding people who put too much emphasis on things.

I will say this, though… I think some people over-prepare. I think that happens more often than people want to say. They put too much importance on things, and over-prepare because those are things they can control. Just as you can't control your opponents, or the wind, or your good or bad bounces… you can't control everything. Sure, pack a rain jacket if it might rain, but chill out, otherwise. It's just a game, and if your gameplay is inflexible because you've tried to control everything, any little disturbance is going to throw you for a loop. Be flexible.

And, somehow, learn to enjoy pressure. If you don't want to ever enjoy pressure, stop playing competitive golf.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I saw this thread and wanted to ask you something when I could get the chance, and now I think my question isn't that great.

Nevertheless, do you think that every golfer has some sort of natural cap on his ability? I.e., do you think that one golfer can only top out at a 10 handicap while another one could tap out at a scratch player? Or if do you think that any golfer could get to a certain point?

I have a tendency to repeat myself, but in essence, I'm asking how much can hard work do for a golfer? Do you think anybody could be a PGA Tour player? Could anybody be a scratch golfer? Or is hard work only going to get you to a certain point, and then you need some natural ability or talent?

For what it's worth, I think there is a certain point where no matter how hard you work, you won't get better. Not everyone can play on the PGA Tour. But I have no idea where that point is. And I hope, for my sake, that the point is quite a bit lower than a 9. :-D

Some other questions have come to mind while writing this, but I'll wait to jump back in until this thread stagnates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

2 minutes ago, DeadMan said:

I saw this thread and wanted to ask you something when I could get the chance, and now I think my question isn't that great.

Doesn't hurt to ask though. So I'm glad you did.

2 minutes ago, DeadMan said:

Nevertheless, do you think that every golfer has some sort of natural cap on his ability? I.e., do you think that one golfer can only top out at a 10 handicap while another one could tap out at a scratch player? Or if do you think that any golfer could get to a certain point?

I have a tendency to repeat myself, but in essence, I'm asking how much can hard work do for a golfer? Do you think anybody could be a PGA Tour player? Could anybody be a scratch golfer? Or is hard work only going to get you to a certain point, and then you need some natural ability or talent?

I do think there's an upper limit (or a lower limit, depending on how you look at things) for a player, particularly when they come to the game later in life.

I think there's something to be said for a few types of things you can't teach:

  • The ability to "find the golf ball."
  • Speed.
  • Touch.
  • The ability to learn and apply.

I think some people are just born doing some or all of those things better than other people (and maybe I left some off the list). But, one by one:

Ability to Find the Golf Ball
Some players, for example, you can tell them to stand six inches too close to the ball, take their arms straight up in the air, and bend both knees on the follow-through, and they'll still hit the golf ball more solidly than not. Other players can't seem to hit the ball solidly if you tell them to put their chin down a little more at address. Call it hand-eye coordination or whatever you want, but some people have it and some people don't.

Speed
Self-explanatory. You can either jump really high, or run really fast, or swing a stick really fast when you're a kid, or you can't. There's only a little you can do to become "fast" at something. Having the proper technique helps you get the most out of whatever speed you have. But, everyone has a natural speed limit.

Touch
I think everyone has the touch necessary to get down to a pretty low handicap, but not everyone has the touch  required to get down to less than that.

Learning and Applying
And I don't just mean from an instructor, but some people are better at learning how to do things. Some people are better at trial and error, or finding a way that works. Others can be told exactly what to do and still struggle, while some people naturally find a way to do something.

I could have added the mental game in there, too - some players are more cut out for golf and shooting good scores, while others are not. See the above answer, though, for my own limitations on being able to discuss the mental game. It's not something with which I've ever really struggled, so it's tough for me to say anything but "just have a good mental game, then!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Edit:  You kind of just answered this before I finished writing this.  Took me a long time to finish, work pulled me away in the middle of writing this post.

I thought you'd be the one to ask this.  This is a question about potential of an average high handicapper.  Say this golfer played casually, a couple times a year, since his twenties.  Then, at 57 years old, he worked on his game a bit and got down to a 17 HI. Let's assume this person is going to put about 10 hours a week into playing and practicing.  This person thinks he has about average innate talent as a golfer of his age and experience.  (This hypothetical golfer is pretty much identical to me). 

In your experience, how much unrealized potential does this golfer have?  

My guess is that he could maybe get as low as a 13 HI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 minutes ago, No Mulligans said:

Edit: I now see the previous post which was posted while I was writing this.  That one is in a similar vein.

I thought you'd be the one to ask this.  This is a question about potential of an average high handicapper.  Say this golfer played casually, a couple times a year, since his twenties.  Then, at 57 years old, he worked on his game a bit and got down to a 17 HI. Let's assume this person is going to put about 10 hours a week into playing and practicing.  This person thinks he has about average innate talent as a golfer of his age and experience.  (This hypothetical golfer is pretty much identical to me). 

In your experience, how much unrealized potential does this golfer have?  How much lower could he get his HI?

My guess is that he could maybe get as low as a 13 HI.

Yeah, it's pretty much like the above. I don't know enough about how far you hit the ball, etc. to say, but I think if you're a 16.3 now, there's no reason you couldn't aim for better than a 13. If I were you, I'd set my sights on being a single-digit golfer. After all, that's only shooting about an 80 HALF of the time you play golf. Aim for the stars, as they say. Don't be obnoxiously optimistic, but don't just say "I think I can get two strokes better, tops" either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Seeing as you live on the shores of the great Lakes Erie, how often do you walleye fish? And what is the biggest walleye you have caught there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

18 minutes ago, 14ledo81 said:

Seeing as you live on the shores of the great Lakes Erie, how often do you walleye fish? And what is the biggest walleye you have caught there?

I used to, from the boat we had when I was a kid. We had downriggers and would troll for walleye fairly often.

Which, now that I look back on it, kind of sucked. I didn't like the taste of walleye (I love trout, salmon, steelhead, etc.). But walleye and perch, blech. Never did it for me.

And, the damn things weren't even fun to catch. It was like pulling up a sunken log, except you couldn't bring them up too fast or their bladders would be up and out their throats, and you couldn't release them back if they weren't big enough for you.

fish_stringer.jpgThe biggest? I don't know that we kept track. I know we had some that were over 10 pounds. Initially I wanted to say we had some that were almost 15 pounds, but then I looked at some world records and maybe that wasn't the case! :-)

I hunted and fished quite a bit as a kid. I was even in a fishing magazine… where they spelled my name wrong.

Bastards.

http://nslog.com/2003/07/23/my_first_limit_and_fishing_renewed

 

I don't fish much these days, because after fishing for snook, redfish, and shark from my kayaks in Florida, I can't really get all that excited about catching bass or perch.

And… I'd love to fisk for the ol' muskellunge, but I'm not sure where they are around here. I don't think they're super plentiful. I could be wrong.

Not that I'd have time to do it anyway… :-(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Dear Abby, err, I mean Erik.

With the high level of instruction which you have achieved, do you have any ambition to become affiliated with tour players?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

9 minutes ago, Club Rat said:

Dear Abby, err, I mean Erik.

With the high level of instruction which you have achieved, do you have any ambition to become affiliated with tour players?

No. None.

I have worked with some. More than people know. It's not something I find very interesting. Plus, travel… blech.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, iacas said:

I have worked with some. More than people know. It's not something I find very interesting. Plus, travel… blech.

I know this is your thread @iacas but I just wanted to add that teaching tour players may seem a lot more "glamorous" from the outside but once you start it's a huge pain in the ass. I know two great instructors that have done it and stopped because it was too much of a hassle for too little of a reward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

6 hours ago, Pretzel said:

What do you like most about being a part of the golf industry, and what do you dislike the most?

I'll give you a few things, because at various times they're all capable of being the top item on each list. Now obviously I can also only speak to what I do in the golf industry, which is:

  • Teach golf.
  • Run this site.
  • Write about golf (books, articles, here. Videos too.)
  • Train Instructors.
  • Travel to do some of the above.

I don't have much of course to do with the world of golf beyond instruction, or equipment. We fit some Edel stuff, but that's it, and I haven't got the first clue how to run a golf course, despite the PGA's best efforts with their ridiculously poor standard course materials.

Best Things

  • It's a game, and better yet, one I can play for a long, long time. I look forward to, hopefully, playing with my daughter for a long time, for example. I really, really, really love the game of golf. It encapsulates so much of what I like about life: being outdoors, challenging yourself, taking responsibility (blame and credit), getting to spend time alone or with a small group of friends, etc.
  • I enjoy virtually every student I teach, and am proud of the work I do in helping them have a better golf game. It's corny but it's true: I like to make people's lives a little bit better by helping them to enjoy playing better golf.
  • I get to set my own schedule. Though, per the answer above, oftentimes that means working way, way, way, WAY more than 40 hours a week… I also can just schedule a random Thursday off to do something I want to do far more easily than others.
  • I enjoy learning, and it's an ongoing process.
  • If you look hard enough you'll meet and work with some great people.

Worst Things

  • You almost never get to play. They say if you want to play very little golf while being around it constantly, join the golf business.
  • You can't make people do things they don't want to do, or realize that improving at golf is not going to be a quick fix type of thing. It's frustrating to help someone, know they'll get better, only to see them a month later, ask what's up, and have them say "it stopped working after a few days so I've been trying to do this other completely unrelated thing lately."
  • This is far from unique to the golf industry, but there are a lot of "bad eggs" out there who bring the industry down, with relatively few good eggs to make up for them.
  • Pace of play. Though not at all related to teaching, it has a big impact on the first bullet point in this section. I'd be able to play a lot more golf if it took 3:30 instead of 4:30 to 5:00.

Day to day, I think that almost covers it. Occasionally other things pop up, but… not often enough to worry about. Good or bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...