Jump to content
IGNORED

Anchoring foot against tee marker


Bill926
 Share

Note: This thread is 2017 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Recommended Posts

I played in this clubs open tournament over the weekend and one of the guys in my group would anchor his left foot against the left tee marker when teeing off.  Is this allowed?  I have never seen that before so I didn't want to say anything.  

I don't think anyone would have cared anyway because another guy kept re-aligning his ball on the green after he already picked his marker up and no one said anything.  Guess I could have brought it up at the scorers table at the end, but I wouldn't want to be "that guy".

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Did he move the teemarker in the proces? That is not allowed.

If you see something in your flight and wait untill after the round to say something, in my book you are that guy. Moving or touching your ball the way you described is not allowed. Say something at the moment it happens in a polite way.

Edited by MacDutch
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

5 minutes ago, Bill926 said:

I played in this clubs open tournament over the weekend and one of the guys in my group would anchor his left foot against the left tee marker when teeing off.  Is this allowed?  I have never seen that before so I didn't want to say anything.  

I don't think anyone would have cared anyway because another guy kept re-aligning his ball on the green after he already picked his marker up and no one said anything.  Guess I could have brought it up at the scorers table at the end, but I wouldn't want to be "that guy".

I can see two potential problems:

1)  He could be accused of "building a stance."

2)  If the tee marker moves even the slightest bit, I would certainly rule he had intentionally moved the tee marker by placing his foot there, and thus he would be charged a two-stroke penalty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


7 minutes ago, wadesworld said:

2)  If the tee marker moves even the slightest bit

It didn't move noticeably from 10 feet away, but I'm sure it had to slightly move with the weight of the foot against it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites


If anything, an opportunity to get into his head was lost... You could have said that doing this, the ball must have to be in a perfect spot each time.... That's a lot to think about and then walk away....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The "Decisions" state that a player who moves a marker before or after a stroke in anger is not penalized, provided the player replaces the marker.  Same with accidentally tripping over one or even just picking it up and putting it back.  It seems like the Rules are not too concerned with the marker being moved except when it assists a player or changes the area of the teeing ground.

It is hard to imagine a player is going to get much support or brace from a tee marker.  By its very nature, a tee marker needs to be easily moved.  I suspect it is a psychological assist to the player. He probably draws or hooks the ball and wants to stand as far to the left as possible but without the tee marker being between his stance and the ball.

Unless the player visibly moved the tee marker, I would not be inclined to question the player or report the action.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

14 minutes ago, Martyn W said:

Better to be 'that guy' than the guy who is disqualified: See D33-7/9   :http://www.usga.org/rules/rules-and-decisions.html#!decision-33

Nice to know that!  Makes sense that by not saying anything I'm allowing him to turn in an incorrect score.

This brings up a couple questions though:

Would this only involve the player and the marker?  In other words if a third payer notices it, he could essentially have both the player and the marker DQ'd at the scoring table?  Would the third player be Dq'd as well for knowingly allow the wrong score?

Link to comment
Share on other sites


12 minutes ago, Bill926 said:

ould this only involve the player and the marker?  In other words if a third payer notices it, he could essentially have both the player and the marker DQ'd at the scoring table?  Would the third player be Dq'd as well for knowingly allow the wrong score?

From the Decision:  "it would be reasonable to expect a fellow-competitor or another competitor to bring to light a player's breach of the Rules by notifying the player, his marker or the Committee." (my bold) In other words, any player in the field. If you think about it, if one player returns a score two strokes lower than his true score, he is basically penalizing the whole field two strokes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites


I'd not be that concerned about the tee marker if it didn't noticeably move (I certainly don't see it as building a stance if the marker doesn't move), but what he did on the green I would definitely mention to him or his marker if he had one.  Once he lifts the marker, he is not allowed to touch or move the ball unless he re-marks it.  I'd have certainly called him on that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

2 hours ago, bkuehn1952 said:

The "Decisions" state that a player who moves a marker before or after a stroke in anger is not penalized, provided the player replaces the marker.  Same with accidentally tripping over one or even just picking it up and putting it back.  It seems like the Rules are not too concerned with the marker being moved except when it assists a player or changes the area of the teeing ground.

It is hard to imagine a player is going to get much support or brace from a tee marker.  By its very nature, a tee marker needs to be easily moved.  I suspect it is a psychological assist to the player. He probably draws or hooks the ball and wants to stand as far to the left as possible but without the tee marker being between his stance and the ball.

Unless the player visibly moved the tee marker, I would not be inclined to question the player or report the action.

But isn't that still, by its nature, an advantage? It seems off to me that a player would be allowed to consistently brace himself with the tee marker, even if the advantage is just psychological.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

4 hours ago, Bill926 said:

It didn't noticeably move so I would say no.

I am not that guy and wouldn't do that, but I have seen it done many times.

Due respect, but you ARE that guy -- to the rest of the field who you are supposed to be protecting.  Maybe not on the tee marker thing, although you should have raised the question, but definitely on the the adjusting of the an unmarked ball on the green.  

But you bring it up immediately, not at the scorer's table after saying nothing during the round.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Nothing wrong with that as long as he doesn't add anything to it or move it.  If he was to wad up a towel and place it against the marker, then press against that, I'd take issue with it, but he's simply using something that's already part of the course.  Anyone else could do the same if they chose to do so.  

I don't really see how it would be much a help anyway.  It would be difficult to tee your ball in exactly the right spot so that you wouldn't have to mess with your stance to make a swing.  It could even impede him getting on his left side through the swing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, jamo said:

But isn't that still, by its nature, an advantage? It seems off to me that a player would be allowed to consistently brace himself with the tee marker, even if the advantage is just psychological.

The Rules don't recognize mental interference (e.g. one is bothered by a sprinkler head close to one's ball but not truly interfering with a stroke).  On that basis, I would conclude that something that truly does not support or brace his stance and is merely a mental crutch would not be in breach of the Rules.

It is certainly a fine line and the player, to be perfectly safe, probably should make sure he does not actually touch the marker.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

32 minutes ago, Fourputt said:

Nothing wrong with that as long as he doesn't add anything to it or move it.  If he was to wad up a towel and place it against the marker, then press against that, I'd take issue with it, but he's simply using something that's already part of the course.  Anyone else could do the same if they chose to do so.  

I don't really see how it would be much a help anyway.  It would be difficult to tee your ball in exactly the right spot so that you wouldn't have to mess with your stance to make a swing.  It could even impede him getting on his left side through the swing.

 

17 minutes ago, bkuehn1952 said:

The Rules don't recognize mental interference (e.g. one is bothered by a sprinkler head close to one's ball but not truly interfering with a stroke).  On that basis, I would conclude that something that truly does not support or brace his stance and is merely a mental crutch would not be in breach of the Rules.

It is certainly a fine line and the player, to be perfectly safe, probably should make sure he does not actually touch the marker.  

I just don't see how it's physically possible to put your foot up against it, swing a golf club, and not move it, unless we're getting into an "oscillation" argument here. The rules against building your stance are always applied so liberally that it would stun me if you could use a tee marker to brace your foot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

50 minutes ago, Fourputt said:

 It would be difficult to tee your ball in exactly the right spot so that you wouldn't have to mess with your stance to make a swing.

it was part of his setup routine.  He would put his foot against the marker and set the ball from there, adjusting it until it was good.

57 minutes ago, turtleback said:

Due respect, but you ARE that guy -- to the rest of the field who you are supposed to be protecting.  Maybe not on the tee marker thing, although you should have raised the question, but definitely on the the adjusting of the an unmarked ball on the green.  

But you bring it up immediately, not at the scorer's table after saying nothing during the round.  

Looking back on it now i should have said something on the first green, but still I'd never purposely wait until the end of the round and then bring it up.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites


3 hours ago, jamo said:

 

I just don't see how it's physically possible to put your foot up against it, swing a golf club, and not move it, unless we're getting into an "oscillation" argument here. The rules against building your stance are always applied so liberally that it would stun me if you could use a tee marker to brace your foot.

It is if you have lousy foot and leg action in your swing.  I've known guys whose feet never moved during their swing.    

It also sounds like it took him a lot of fiddling around to get set up right, so I might have cautioned him about undue delay - although I'm not always terribly polite if I get sufficiently frustrated.  ("For God's sake, quit screwing around and hit the blanking ball!!!")

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Note: This thread is 2017 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • Support TST Affiliates

    TourStriker PlaneMate
    Golfer's Journal
    Whoop
    SuperSpeed
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo and the code "iacasjun21" for 10% off SuperSpeed.
  • Posts

    • Commenting ,just before  taking the shot (especially negative thoughts) affect your golf swing. Man I feel bad for you. It was awful. Action with some new rules should be taken for this. 
    • Well, at least you have the par-4s down!  I had a round a few weeks ago at my home course that would have been my second-ever no sixes (first was not at my home course)... played the par-5s in -1 (all pars and a birdie), but two sixes on par-4s did me in for the challenge.  Thankfully I have the badge from two years ago or so, but it'll be nice to have a few more rounds that fit this. 
    • Day 206.  Stop me if you've heard this one before.  15 minutes after work of 6-iron shots (about a half dozen total balls this time).  Same focus:  setup, backswing pace and length.
    • Day 52: COVID-19 day 6/7 short game drills. After that, did a few minutes of rehearsals for my priority piece. Lesson coming up at the end of this week to see where I have gone wrong with this one.
    • Agreed. You always seem to have a brain-fart hole where you even just make bogey on a par-five and you’re toast. I usually am able to do it about 1 in 4 rounds, and it’s usually a bogey on a par-five that does me in. (Or the occasional brain-fart 6 on a par-3)
  • Today's Birthdays

    1. goofi22
      goofi22
      (43 years old)
    2. HackardLaw
      HackardLaw
      (38 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...