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Anyone use graphite shafts on their irons?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Everyone says graphite on your irons is for old people. I can get a good 15-20 yards more with graphite.

 

What are the cons of graphite shafts on your irons? 

 

thanks 


Edited by Cossackred - 4/12/11 at 9:18pm
post #2 of 18

I don't see anything wrong with a beginner using graphite shafted irons. You are just trying to get it out there, not firing at the pins yet. How far are you hitting the ball? Graphite makes the ball go further, but if you don't need the length, switch to steel. 

 

To answer your questions...

- I suggest steel for almost everyone. Accuracy and distance control are more important than power. In your situation, however, graphite is not going to hurt you for a year or so because you are a beginner. If you ever want to make the leap to another level in accuracy and distance control, you definitely need steel. You could go with regular flex steel, instead of stiff steel, if you are worried about losing a lot of distance.

- I use steel and have been playing steel since I got a cut-down set of Nicklaus blades when I was 7 years old. They didn't have much graphite or junior golf technology when I was a kid, but I think it made me a better ball-striker anyway.

- The pros are NOT playing graphite irons. I cannot think of one. Maybe someone can prove me wrong. Many senior tour players still play steel (at least what I have seen in the little senior pga i watch during the year). 

 

post #3 of 18

I use graphite shafts that are regular flex. I was very concerned about this as the guy building my clubs is our local golf pro and I had the same question. I decided to just go with the graphite shafts and I have been very happy with them. I have my distances quite solid with them, as long as my swing is the same..lol. My clubs are custom built and I have played the same exact set with steel shafts and hit them exactly the same. For me they work great and our local pro is just about scratch and his distances are extremely consistent with is graphite shafts.

post #4 of 18

AJ Choe has been using graphite iron shafts. The quality of graphite shafts have improved greatly. It's now to the point of what you prefer. Since the graphite are lighter than steel shafts the swing weight of the clubs changes. The right head weight to shaft weight ratio must be maintained to retain the same swing weight. A good club builder will get this right.

 

The dispersion of graphite is good enough now that more iron heads will be built with graphite shafts in mind. When this happens more, having learned the game with graphite shafts, will be comfortable with graphite shafts. Just as the younger pro golfers are starting to convert to belly and broomstick putters. The inherent advantage graphite has over steel is the ability to custom design shafts with more varying characteristics.

 

Currently I play 6 different sets of irons (yes-its a disease) 3 with graphite shafts and three with iron shafts. The playability is the same with the biggest difference between the steel shafts. Project X shafts vs Hogan apex shafts. I soon will be adding a hickory wood shafted set. I'm guessing these clubs will be a bit more of a challenge!!!!

 

 

In Summary --- IMHO ----GO FOR IT.

post #5 of 18

i use graphite and steel in the two sets i have and there is no difference in distance and dispersion.  some people just believe that graphite is meant for those who struggle with the extra weight of steel.  now that lighter steel is available (Nippon 850GHs for example) and torque in graphite has been lowered to match steel (Alpha Luxe and Platinums) the only difference is that with graphite you can build a longer club and maintain the preferred balance.  and EVERYONE knows that LONGER clubs go farther than shorter, right?  I mean, that's why most store bought drivers are 45" or longer even though most pros are playing 44.5" or shorter, right?  The extra length is there to make up for the lack of swing speed. right?

just in case you can't tell, i'm only being facetious about that.

post #6 of 18

Graphite basicly has more torque than steel, so the dispersion is bigger (just by specs only).

 

Graphite dampens the vibration from thinned or bladed shots, so it adds comfort, but it also dampens feel.

 

For me .... I take the punishment of a bit hit and like to feel my mistakes, I can tell where on the face it was hit ..... that isn't possible with graphite.

 

I like the higher total weight of a standard steel shafted club.

 

One might prefer the feel of steel, while for the other the comfort of graphite might be a plus.

post #7 of 18

I agree with Tweaky. Graphite shaft technology has improved massively over the past decade or so, but then so has ultra-light steel shaft technology. By reducing the total weight of the club, using either will generally allow lower swing speed golfers to generate more club head speed and get more distance. Whether that comes at the expense of control is going to depend mostly on those golfers' swings and ability. Graphite shafts also generally feel "smoother", which some people prefer. Others like the feedback you get from the hit/kick of a steel shaft. On the cost side, graphite shafts are more expensive, so that's one clear negative.

 

As far as pros playing graphite, I believe Matt Kuchar uses Aerotech Steelfibers*. Most of those guys are not ever going to switch simply because they have very acute feels developed from playing steel shafts their entire careers, since graphite was not a legitimate alternative (for irons) until very recently. I bet you'll see plenty of juniors coming through with graphite in the future and then sticking with it.

 

(* OK, that's kind of a hybrid steel/graphite. But I think it still counts. a1_smile.gif)

post #8 of 18

the reasoning is off, the majority of players on tour enjoy the benefits of graphite in all their longest clubs ( woods and hybrids) the clubs that have the highest swingspeeds. torque the most flex the most etc...You dont experience that kind of force with the irons...seems to me ..if the steel shafts are best wouldnt they all use them in every club especially the longest length


Edited by weavej2 - 4/13/11 at 7:17am
post #9 of 18

The role of the woods is to hit the ball as far as possible with acceptable accuracy. The role of the irons is to hit the ball as accurately as possible with acceptable distance. So it's perfectly logical that most players have been willing to sacrifice some control with the woods in order to pick up extra distance, but not willing to do the same with their irons. The real question now, though, is whether that trade-off still exists. Some club fitters will tell you that the manufacturing consistency (ie. performance to spec throughout the set) of high-quality graphite iron shafts is now better than that of most steel shafts. 

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

The clubs I'm using are new 2011 clubs but are the regular graphite shafts that come with the clubs. Would these be of better design to give me better accuracy than older graphite shafts? Or would that only be top quality custom shafts that are better? I'm thinking accuracy should be my number one concern at the moment and not length...even though it's nice seeing that ball fly past my ball hit with the steel shafts. It could be my swing, but I've been to the range 4-5 times swinging both and it's been the same every time. The steel shafts are also 2011, so would those be lighter that normal older steel shafts? They do feel a bit heavy, but I've been using graphite for a while now. I guess in the end, I'd rather be aiming for pins than hitting 15 yards longer.

post #11 of 18

My old irons had graphite shafts.  The biggest issue I had with the graphite shafts was the weight difference between my irons and wedges.  My wedges were steel shaft, and weighed significantly more than my irons, so they felt totally different swinging them compared to irons.  I guess I could have reshafted the wedges to graphite or ultra light steel, but that could get pretty expensive.  My new irons have steel shafts so they feel the same as my wedges as a result I'm hitting them much better. 

post #12 of 18

My clubs are circa 2004-2006 (im not sure bought them 2nd hand)

 

They have reg flex graphite shafts in them. I really launch the ball a good 1-2 clubs above everyone else I play with who uses steel shafted irons. I have demo'd steel shafts and not lost any distance (particularly G15 irons).


Do you guys think that someone who plays around bogey golf(would be better if I could get up and down sometimes) would be better off switching to a steel set?

 

Also if I want to improve would I be better off getting something like Ap1/Ap2 or something like G15. I want to actually improve in the next 2 years not just have the clubs make me better.
 

 

post #13 of 18

My number one reason to never play graphite in irons? Durability and weight. They're too light and they break down faster than steel shafts, especially when being scraped across other irons several times per round. and no, iron covers is not the answer.



@joepro23 - yup

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joepro23 View Post

I don't see anything wrong with a beginner using graphite shafted irons. You are just trying to get it out there, not firing at the pins yet. How far are you hitting the ball? Graphite makes the ball go further, but if you don't need the length, switch to steel. 

 

To answer your questions...

- I suggest steel for almost everyone. Accuracy and distance control are more important than power. In your situation, however, graphite is not going to hurt you for a year or so because you are a beginner. If you ever want to make the leap to another level in accuracy and distance control, you definitely need steel. You could go with regular flex steel, instead of stiff steel, if you are worried about losing a lot of distance.

- I use steel and have been playing steel since I got a cut-down set of Nicklaus blades when I was 7 years old. They didn't have much graphite or junior golf technology when I was a kid, but I think it made me a better ball-striker anyway.

- The pros are NOT playing graphite irons. I cannot think of one. Maybe someone can prove me wrong. Many senior tour players still play steel (at least what I have seen in the little senior pga i watch during the year). 

 



 



@ Gerald - yes, all that.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerald View Post

Graphite basicly has more torque than steel, so the dispersion is bigger (just by specs only).

 

Graphite dampens the vibration from thinned or bladed shots, so it adds comfort, but it also dampens feel.

 

For me .... I take the punishment of a bit hit and like to feel my mistakes, I can tell where on the face it was hit ..... that isn't possible with graphite.

 

I like the higher total weight of a standard steel shafted club.

 

One might prefer the feel of steel, while for the other the comfort of graphite might be a plus.



@ Daniel - Who dat? I assume you're referring to KJ Choi? There are female players from Asia playing more of a players setup than Choi. I wouldn't put any of that cat's gear in my bag to be honest. Different strokes for different folks.

 

Quote:
AJ Choe has been using graphite iron shafts. The  

 

 

 

 



@ Cossackred - exactly, that's what it's all about with the irons.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cossackred View Post

The clubs I'm using are new 2011 clubs but are the regular graphite shafts that come with the clubs. Would these be of better design to give me better accuracy than older graphite shafts? Or would that only be top quality custom shafts that are better? I'm thinking accuracy should be my number one concern at the moment and not length...even though it's nice seeing that ball fly past my ball hit with the steel shafts. It could be my swing, but I've been to the range 4-5 times swinging both and it's been the same every time. The steel shafts are also 2011, so would those be lighter that normal older steel shafts? They do feel a bit heavy, but I've been using graphite for a while now. I guess in the end, I'd rather be aiming for pins than hitting 15 yards longer.



PS. Forgive the multiquote - seeing this post, and knowing I made . . my skin is crawling.

post #14 of 18

LOL @ AJ Choe


 

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

My number one reason to never play graphite in irons? Durability and weight. They're too light and they break down faster than steel shafts, especially when being scraped across other irons several times per round. and no, iron covers is not the answer.


That's two reasons.

 

MOOL-TEE-PASSQUOTE

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by joepro23 View Post

I don't see anything wrong with a beginner using graphite shafted irons. You are just trying to get it out there, not firing at the pins yet. How far are you hitting the ball? Graphite makes the ball go further, but if you don't need the length, switch to steel. 

To answer your questions...
- I suggest steel for almost everyone. Accuracy and distance control are more important than power. In your situation, however, graphite is not going to hurt you for a year or so because you are a beginner. If you ever want to make the leap to another level in accuracy and distance control, you definitely need steel. You could go with regular flex steel, instead of stiff steel, if you are worried about losing a lot of distance.
- I use steel and have been playing steel since I got a cut-down set of Nicklaus blades when I was 7 years old. They didn't have much graphite or junior golf technology when I was a kid, but I think it made me a better ball-striker anyway.
- The pros are NOT playing graphite irons. I cannot think of one. Maybe someone can prove me wrong. Many senior tour players still play steel (at least what I have seen in the little senior pga i watch during the year). 

I came to this area of The Sand Trap because I'm considering Project X graphite shafts for some Mizuno irons I have. And then, what do I see?...what conceit! "You are just a beginner!" Are you kidding me? So what if no Pros are using graphite...they are outstanding shafts and weigh almost nothing! When you get passed 60...well, weight matters, let me tell you! Besides, almost EVERY pro uses graphite in their woods and hybrids...what's with that? Eh? You are just a beginner! Shoot, man, everyone was a beginner once! I wish golf would just lose this arrogance about beginners...it's killing the game! Who wants to join a bunch of snobs?
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justagolfer View Post

I came to this area of The Sand Trap because I'm considering Project X graphite shafts for some Mizuno irons I have. And then, what do I see?...what conceit! "You are just a beginner!" Are you kidding me? So what if no Pros are using graphite...they are outstanding shafts and weigh almost nothing! When you get passed 60...well, weight matters, let me tell you! Besides, almost EVERY pro uses graphite in their woods and hybrids...what's with that? Eh? You are just a beginner! Shoot, man, everyone was a beginner once! I wish golf would just lose this arrogance about beginners...it's killing the game! Who wants to join a bunch of snobs?

Well, this thread is over 2 years old.

 

Graphite shafts are great ... Matt Kuchar and Brandt Snedeker use Aerotech Steelfiber 95g shafts - they have a graphite core with micro steel strands surrounding the graphite. Their torque is low, lower than many steel shafts. They feel great and are consistent.

 

UST now has the Recoil Shafts. Oban, Matrix, and others have fine graphite shafts.

post #18 of 18
Bump, has anyone here tried using graphite shafts in just a long iron or two? I have been thinking about doing that in my 3 and possibly 4 iron, if I can maintain the same swing weight.
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