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Getting into PURE Grips

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7 minutes ago, Hardspoon said:

Yeah, not a big deal obviously, but it's weird, right?  And odd that they'd show it on the site as an actual "thing".

I'm strangely intrigued by this now, and I'm trying to figure out why.

Here's a post from 2013 (from another forum, found on Google) that mentions it, so it's nothing new.  "The white grips are always the heaviest".

image.png

It’s not weird to me, but I already knew about different dyes having different chemical makeups (and thus why manufacturers can’t just go and make golf balls whatever color they want).

It might be odd for them to show it on their website but I’m happy for the transparency.

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19 minutes ago, Hardspoon said:

And odd that they'd show it on the site as an actual "thing".

No, it would affect swing weights and stuff, so people want to know what a grip weighs. And then they weigh it themselves, but still… if you're replacing one grip with another, you might want to match it up. Or go lighter or heavier on purpose.

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10 hours ago, Hardspoon said:

I'm not sure if this is the correct thread, but I was looking for new grips today and noticed this:

image.png

It seems like the weight for the grips changes...by color?!?  Seemed so strange.

Pigments have different chemical make up and can require varied addition amounts to get the desired color. White is usually titanium dioxide, which is metallic and needs more to get the white they want. The green pigment is probably very effective in small amounts, so it doesn’t add much weight. Black and gray could have carbon black.
 

The colorant suppliers have pallets that they work with and provide the materials to the molding companies to get the color match. In molding, the colorant is blended with the plastic or rubber in a hopper prior to melting and molding. In plastics, it is usually a pigment because the color is dispersed and is not really soluble in the plastic. Dyes dissolve and are used in more fluid applications. They are either water or oil soluble depending on the product.

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5 hours ago, boogielicious said:

Pigments have different chemical make up and can require varied addition amounts to get the desired color. White is usually titanium dioxide, which is metallic and needs more to get the white they want. The green pigment is probably very effective in small amounts, so it doesn’t add much weight. Black and gray could have carbon black.
 

The colorant suppliers have pallets that they work with and provide the materials to the molding companies to get the color match. In molding, the colorant is blended with the plastic or rubber in a hopper prior to melting and molding. In plastics, it is usually a pigment because the color is dispersed and is not really soluble in the plastic. Dyes dissolve and are used in more fluid applications. They are either water or oil soluble depending on the product.

Classic Scott. Classic.👍

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