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mikeparker

Putters for $100 or Less

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I got my Yes! putter for $25! It was a return that got mis-priced and the sales guy just shrugged and said, "sticker says $25 so that's what I'm charging you." :-D

Just hit a golf store and try out all the putters that are $100 or less, tons of great putters available at that price especially if you don't mind last year's model. IIRC the Cleveland Classics line is all around $100 and I've heard great things about them.

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I got my Yes! putter for $25! It was a return that got mis-priced and the sales guy just shrugged and said, "sticker says $25 so that's what I'm charging you."

You're lucky. I went to a store once and picked up a club from the clearance bag with a clearance sticker on it and they guy told me they're mislabeled and refused to sell them to me at the marked price.

To the OP, I'd check out some older models, as well. I personally use an Odyssey White Ice #9, I believe the whole line is less than $100 now.

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The first thing I would suggest that you do is go find as many putters to try out as you can without looking at the price tags.  As a generality, if you have a fairly strong arc in your putting stroke you will want a putter with more toe drop when you balance the shaft across your finger horizontally (toe tends to point down toward the ground).  If you have a pretty straight back and through stroke a more face balanced putter will probably serve better (face points toward the sky when balanced).  I didn't make that up, but it seems to be agreed by most.  Ping makes putters and marks them specifically for what sort of stroke you use, their web site probably has info on the logic.

Once you have hit enough, hopefully you will sort of settle in on a particular style that works best for your stroke looks right to you.  There are some funny lookin' putters out there!  They help some people, annoy others.  But once you sort of pick a style you are looking for you can begin sorting by price point more logically and you can start watching the used racks for a deal on something that may match your desires and is pre-depreciated.

Good luck with your search!

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Macgregor 2501 is a very nice putter that I wish I still have but I gave it away. $59.99 Golfsmith. The insert has a very identical feel to the TM spider.

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Go someplace with used clubs, and just putt around until you find one that works. Putters have very different feels, and some will just feel better to you.

I had tried a number of putters at Dicks and found that I liked a 34" TaylorMade that was $89. Then I swung by Joe and Leighs (the brick and mortar of the 3 Balls website) and just started grabbing used putters at random. As soon as I picked one up, I knew it was for me because it felt RIGHT and I was sending the ball pretty much where I wanted it to go (granted, it was on a flat indoor surface). The best part? It was an Odyssey in near-mint condition for $25.

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My brother got a Ping Anser or Karsten for under $100 and it's definitely a putter I could have played with.

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I agree with the other posters about searching for used putters.  From E-bay I have bought a Ping Redwood Anser, Mizuno Bettinardi BC6 and a Scotty Cameron Newport Beach for around $100 each.  I currently use the Cameron with the Mizuno as my back-up.  My son uses the Ping.

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Putters form the Cleveland Classic line are nice and under 100 bucks new. Used and they should be even cheaper. I have been using an HB3 fro some time now and works great for me.

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Cleveland Classics are fantastic. Milled putters on the cheap. Many component putters are under $100, but take a bit of time (and some skill, although the learning curve isn't as steep as i expected) to assemble, particularly your first time. I'm using a Maltby CER putter now that I'm reasonably fond of.
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Go to eBay and find some Bobby Grace putters that are slightly used for under hundred dollars
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I agree with the Cleveland Classic suggestions. They seem to be pretty good putters and are under $100. However, best bet is to probably go to a store and try everything in your price range. See what fits your eye best.

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Hate to throw this in but the grip is another factor you might want to consider. I am using a Cleveland Classic HB3, but didn't entirely fall in love with it until i put one of this Winn fat grips. A lot cheaper than the Super Stroke grips so i went for it. Nothing against the SS grips but the price was high for something i wasn't sure i was going to stick with. Both are basically foam grips with a rubber skin. I do prefer the flat top of the Winn grip.

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Go to eBay and find some Bobby Grace putters that are slightly used for under hundred dollars

I say the above w Grace or any other putter with the proviso that you really don't know what you're getting with any putter unless you can aim it where you're aiming.

Even at a store you're not certain where you're aiming from 10 feet out.

SeeMore has an inexpensive tool - the Triangulator - to test your aim with a putter. You can buy a less than $100 putter, get the Triangulator, and see where you need to make a sight adjustment with a new putter.

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I say the above w Grace or any other putter with the proviso that you really don't know what you're getting with any putter unless you can aim it where you're aiming.

Even at a store you're not certain where you're aiming from 10 feet out.

SeeMore has an inexpensive tool - the Triangulator - to test your aim with a putter. You can buy a less than $100 putter, get the Triangulator, and see where you need to make a sight adjustment with a new putter.

The triangulator seems like a nice little tool. Watched a video on the SeeMore site on how to use it. Not sure if drawing a line on the putting green with a Sharpie would go over well with the golf course management (LOL) but otherwise looked interesting.

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The triangulator seems like a nice little tool. Watched a video on the SeeMore site on how to use it. Not sure if drawing a line on the putting green with a Sharpie would go over well with the golf course management (LOL) but otherwise looked interesting.

I've never done it, but I would think that a contractors chalk line tool would be fine on a practice green and it would go away with the next mow. It would only put down a straight line. Check with course management, naturally.

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Nike Method Core at $80 new was the ticket for me.  After dozens of previous putters, I found the MC3i model to be the answer.

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