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Should PW match your iron set

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I went to Golf Tec for a fitting. I am ordering Ping G20. I saw the new Taylormade ATV wedge and tried them at local club and found them to be very much better than my old Cleveland wedges. Hit 100 balls from lush grass, buried lies, sand, hardpan and snarly rough.Now I am debating which PW to buy...........the G20 version or Taylormade version which I think I prefer.

 

I am leaning towards buying Taylormade PW, GW, SW and lob wedge even though Golf Tec, Ping and most golfing buddies think that PW should be a member if G20 iron set. Seems to me that I will be better off if all 4 wedges have same look and feel. Appreciate your thoughts.

post #2 of 22

I think the PW should match your iron set, especially with sgi irons where it will have 45˚ or less of loft. I'm all for playing the PW like it's a wedge, but it's really not anymore.

 

Personally though, I believe in matching your set as much as possible; same shaft in irons and wedges, matching irons with long irons included, if there are hybrids then match them to length and similar shafts as irons, and match the shafts and similar lengths in all woods with the exception of weight. That way there are fewer differences to learn in your set and you need to alter your swing less.

post #3 of 22

I like to go down to the gap wedge in the irons, because I'm almost always hitting PW and GW with a full swing and want the weighting and feel and turf interaction to be consistent with the rest of the set. SW is the first club I'm using mostly for partial shots and pitches and (obviously) sand shots, so that's where I start the specialist wedges.

post #4 of 22

Agree on PW matching the set.  It really helps to get consistent yardage gaps for approach shots, which will really help your GIR.  I use a GW that matches my wedges.  I may change out the shaft to match my irons though.  I agree with Stretch on the weighting and feel. 

post #5 of 22
I hit a lot of full shots with both my PW and GW so I think it makes sense for them to match the set for consistency. Hit partial shots most of the time with my SW and LW is a specialty club, so those are the wedges that are don't match the set.
post #6 of 22

I could go either way because I use the PW for just about anything from full swing distance all the way to chips from the fringe. I only use the putter more than the PW.

post #7 of 22

I talked to one clubfitter who has people get a specialty PW if they're trying to pick up 6* gaps starting at 9i. If you have a 42* 9i, you could go Vokey or TM ATV (or whatever) for 48*, 54*, 60* and get by with just three wedges.

 

If you expand your  specialty wedges to include a PW, test out the 9i and specialty PW to see how far the yardage gaps are. You probably don't want a strong PW that goes only 6 yds. shorter than your 9i, or a weaker PW that goes 18 yards short of 9i. Don't assume that 4* = 10 yds. when blending irons with specialty wedges of  a different model.

 

Also, be aware that numbered irons generally half-inch length differences between shafts of adjacent irons (5i, 6i). Specialty wedges, however, dont' use this rule. Often you only have quarter-inch length differences (or in case of Cleveland CGs, 1/8" differences) as you move up and down the wedge categories. Club designer Ralph Maltby talks about this on his web site.

 

Old estimation rule for irons is that ( + 4* loft + 1/2" shaft length ) = 10 yards distance difference. So, if you have a 52* GW and a 56* SW (but SW is only 1/8"shorter), then you may not get 10 yds. difference between wedges.

post #8 of 22

I could go either way.  I had planned on getting my PW, GW, SW, and LW to match, and stopping the irons at 9.  I am almost certain it was because of Erik's now non-existent review of the Scor wedges.  The idea being that basically it makes sense that all of your "scoring clubs," one of which is a PW, should match.

 

I ended up not going that route though, just because when I got fitted I happened to like the PW and UW (funny that every brand calls their gaps something different, maybe an inside joke or something?) to match the i20's and the 54 and 59 from the wedge category.

post #9 of 22

I have TaylorMade irons and use two additional Titleist wedges. The TaylorMade's are to my gap wedge, and I have multiple mix and match Titleist wedges depending on the conditions on the golf course (54 degree, 56 degree, 58 degree, 60 degree, different bounces). I don't think it's a problem as long as the shafts are the same (same flex, all steel or all graphite).

post #10 of 22

I think it's more important to have PW and even SW match your irons instead of your other wedges.

 

I have wedges as part of my set down to a 54* SW. To me, I guess it is played like what most of you call a gap wedge. I also have Cleveland CG12 at 56* and 60*  If I'm anywhere inside of 100 yards I'm probably hitting the Cleveland wedges. I'd look for a lob wedge to match my other irons if I didn't like my CG12s so much around the green and out of the sand.

post #11 of 22

I think is more around how far you hit each club and what you are trying to achieve with your wedges.  If you are hitting a PW 135 yards and looking to fill in yardage gaps, then probably best to stick with the PW that matches your set.  If you are in the boat I'm in and hit a PW 100 yards, then putting in an after market PW wedge is probably a better idea.

post #12 of 22

I think you should go with whatever you feel most comfortable with.  If you can swing it, I'd have the G20 wedges from the set AND the TaylorMade wedges.  Which ones you put in the bag on any given day would depend on the course and conditions.  If you have both sets also, you can really get a feel for them and know the distances each one goes.

 

Myself, I play the set listed below.  As you can see, I have CB long and mid irons, a MC 7i and MB blade short irons.  This makes the transition to my Vokey wedges easier.  Plus the fact that my clubs are spec'ed out the way I want them - my PW is 47* not a glorified 9i posing as a PW.  I'm also pretty comfortable hitting choke down 3/4 wedge or short iron shots, so that factors into my decision making on my clubs.  I hit my PW about 125-130 full swing and my 52* about 105-110, so there's a decent gap in there that I've had to learn to adjust to...

post #13 of 22

My PW came with the iron set and I'm happy with it.

I bought a GW and LW of the same brand but different model (solely due to they were on sale) so I'd have those and the plan was to gap out the yardages between the PW (120 yards) and the LW (75 yards full swing).

 

I had an old SW that I like a lot that fit those yardages.  But now, it's a bit annoying to look at because it's shaped differently.  I might just go match the GW and LW so I have the same picture at address.  It's a pretty minor reason - although I'd like it to be a little shorter too.

 

PW (46) - 120 yd

GW (50) - 108 yd

SW (54) - 100 yd

LW (60) - 75 yd

 

I'm finding that after the honeymoon portion when that LW was great for all swings, I'm now 'really' learning it.  I think I'll not be using it for full swings, but will try to learn it for the 50 yards or so and in range.  The loft on it is, for now, a bit more than I'm able to handle yet.  I can likely be more consistent at 70 yards with a half swing on the SW. 

 

lots to learn.

post #14 of 22

What i should say is **** what other people think or do. You should do whatever feels right for you. 

You should keep the yards in mind tho. I personally use a the PW from my iron set. The reason i do 

that is because if i would use an ATV PW i have other yardage than with my pw from my Mizuno set.

the mizuno pw just fits better to my yardage.

 

So do whatever you feel like doing!

post #15 of 22
The PW with most sets now could really be considered a 10-iron. In fact Callaway had a set one year with a 10-iron & PW. The fact is over time the club manufactures have slow increases the loft of all the clubs in a set of irons. Your PW today (likely 45°-47°) is the 9-iron if yesteryear. That's why the GW (typically 50°-53°) was created and it really is the PW of the past. Great article on "loft creep" located here that explains in detail: http://www.leaderboard.com/GLOSSARY_DISTANCETABLE

I carry the an Adams driver, 4-wood (16°), 7-wood (24°) and TA-5s: 5-iron (27°) through PW (45°) & then a wedge set up Cleveland 588s: 51°,57°, 64°. This works for me and probably a lot of others. You are best off if you know your lofts of each club and your average distance with each one. I would not worry too much about matching everything up as long as you are comfortable with your set up and have all your shots covered.
Happy golfing!
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeshot View Post

The PW with most sets now could really be considered a 10-iron. In fact Callaway had a set one year with a 10-iron & PW. The fact is over time the club manufactures have slow increases the loft of all the clubs in a set of irons. Your PW today (likely 45°-47°) is the 9-iron if yesteryear. That's why the GW (typically 50°-53°) was created and it really is the PW of the past. Great article on "loft creep" located here that explains in detail: http://www.leaderboard.com/GLOSSARY_DISTANCETABLE

I carry the an Adams driver, 4-wood (16°), 7-wood (24°) and TA-5s: 5-iron (27°) through PW (45°) & then a wedge set up Cleveland 588s: 51°,57°, 64°. This works for me and probably a lot of others. You are best off if you know your lofts of each club and your average distance with each one. I would not worry too much about matching everything up as long as you are comfortable with your set up and have all your shots covered.
Happy golfing!

I agree, I don't think of my PW as a wedge, at least not in terms of how I use it. I hit it full swing just as if it was a 9i. If I want to hit any kind of touchy, feel-y wedge type shots I will typically use my 56* or 60*. I also have a 52* but never use it as the swing weight is WAY lighter than my other wedges and I tend to hit it thin as a consequence. Gotta get me some lead tape.

post #17 of 22
The thing I like about having the three 588 wedges is they all have the same swing weight, shafts, grips, etc. I use the GW/51° for most chipping and 100 yards in. I use the PW for full shots only as well. The GW/51° is very versatile and is a go to club for a variety of shots. The LW/64° really is more a special situation club and the SW/57° I use for bunker shots and don't really use it for anything else.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeshot View Post

The thing I like about having the three 588 wedges is they all have the same swing weight, shafts, grips, etc. I use the GW/51° for most chipping and 100 yards in. I use the PW for full shots only as well. The GW/51° is very versatile and is a go to club for a variety of shots. The LW/64° really is more a special situation club and the SW/57° I use for bunker shots and don't really use it for anything else.

What's the bounce on your 64* LW?

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