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Rangefinder Feedback - All Input Welcome - Don't Be Shy


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(edited)

Hey guys, 

I did a search on this topic and read some different threads, but wanted to get a little more current conversation going. So let's get down to business. 

I am in the market for a new rangefinder. I have been using the Bushnell V2 for a decade and have had zero issues. It works fine and has been the most reliable club in my bag. Now, I am a little bored and was thinking about a newer, shinier toy. I am not opposed to spending money for quality, the V2 wasn't cheap but it lasted and is reliable. I really don't want a GPS device either. I like the rangefinder, use it for forced carries, front edge, bunkers, etc. Here are some questions that I would like your feedback on:

Slope models: How much value do you place in this feature? Do you use it for casual play? I am curious to "slope" out my current course to see if there are any elevations that I am missing (in South Florida its probably half a club if anything).  

Bushnell V5: They do have refurbished models from the manufacturer on eBay. Anyone ever go this route? Pros: Has a cool magnet feature, scan mode, dedicated slope switch, solid reputation. 

NX9: Free batteries, no scan (is this a big deal?), easily slips into slope mode. Also has a magnet which I think is a bonus.  

So here are my thoughts so far. I like the V5 Slope edition. I don't want to replace the V2 with a better V2, so why not go with a slope version? The slope switch gives it a little more integrity, the magnet is solid, but its a little pricey but I can justify it for quality and based on my habits, I will get my money's worth. 

OK, light it up. Is there another model I should consider that are in this category? Any predictions on what I may do including just keeping the V2? If you made it this far, you are required to comment! 

Edited by TourSpoon
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6 minutes ago, TourSpoon said:

Slope models: How much value do you place in this feature? Do you use it for casual play? I am curious to "slope" out my current course to see if there are any elevations that I am missing (in South Florida its probably half a club if anything). 

Depends on where you live. Even in Ohio, where you can get some elevation changes, I hardly see anything more than a 2-3 yards of difference in the yardage with the slope. I thik it also might depend on your ball flight. If you hit a ball that has a lot of height and steep entry angle, slope doesn't matter as much. 

I have the Leupold DX-4i, and like it alot. It feel well built. I like the graphics on the display. 

 

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I like my Precision Pro NX7, but it is the only rangefinder I have owned and used so I can't make a comparison to other brands. It gives the same distances as my friend's Bushnell (don't know what model), and my other friend's Nikon (also don't know the model). The free battery thing is cool I guess, but I can't see that really being a differentiator between brands.

I'm glad I have one with slope feature, but I don't use it all that much anymore. I play on a couple courses with some extreme elevation changes, including my home course. Initially I used the slope feature quite a bit but after awhile those adjustments are committed to memory. I might use it if I'm playing a new course, but haven't gotten out to a completely new course in over a year now.

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I have a Nikon Coolshot and like it alot. Mine has slope but I recently disabled it. Don't miss it. Been very reliable, great battery life, no issues.  I looked at other more expensive ones, happy with the Nikon.

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I have used Bushnell rangefinders for years. The newer models are really reliable compared to the models I was using 20 years ago. And the design changes incorporated over the years by Bushnell are outstanding. If you can afford it, get the Bushnell.

Recently read a review on the Shot Scope Pro L1 ($199 w slope); it is a good value option. I told a friend about it and he got one on a sale for $159. It works extremely well. Time will tell if the build quality is as good as Bushnell.

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I went from a V4 to the Precision Pro NX9, and I really like the NX 9.  The optics are significantly better.  It DOES have a scan/lock feature, but works slightly different from the V4.  I've never once accidentally turned on the slope feature, and I never use it intentionally.  The internal magnet feels really strong, but I still don't trust it, I leave the unit in the cup holder.  For the price, I haven't seen a better laser.

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53 minutes ago, MiuraMan said:

I have used Bushnell rangefinders for years. The newer models are really reliable compared to the models I was using 20 years ago. And the design changes incorporated over the years by Bushnell are outstanding. If you can afford it, get the Bushnell.

It's not so much about the money, especially when the first one is still kicking after a decade.  Thanks. 

 

46 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

I went from a V4 to the Precision Pro NX9, and I really like the NX 9.  The optics are significantly better.  It DOES have a scan/lock feature, but works slightly different from the V4.  I've never once accidentally turned on the slope feature, and I never use it intentionally.  The internal magnet feels really strong, but I still don't trust it, I leave the unit in the cup holder.  For the price, I haven't seen a better laser.

Thanks, I want the magnet for sure, and want to trust it. Good input. 

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I think the range finder we were born with is the best value and can be trusted. I've never come across a golfer who has an advantage over me using one of those contraptions. Fair play to the marketers however, plenty of golfers use them these days.

Never had one, never want to have one.

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5 minutes ago, JuliWooli said:

I think the range finder we were born with is the best value and can be trusted. I've never come across a golfer who has an advantage over me using one of those contraptions. Fair play to the marketers however, plenty of golfers use them these days.

Never had one, never want to have one.

Haha. Silly comment. You’ve never been at a disadvantage to one who has a range finder? You must play with some bad golfers or never play on courses with elevation changes or both. 

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6 minutes ago, ncates00 said:

Haha. Silly comment. You’ve never been at a disadvantage to one who has a range finder? You must play with some bad golfers or never play on courses with elevation changes or both. 

The problem isn't knowing the yardage. Anyone can work that out close enough without a rangefinder. There's wind, bounce, and other conditions that come into play but solid striking is without doubt the most import. Don't be telling me a rangefinder works that out too.

 

 

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1 minute ago, JuliWooli said:

solid striking is without doubt the most import. Don't be telling me a rangefinder works that out too.

Strawman. Never argued to the contrary. Again--ever played courses with elevation changes?

 

1 minute ago, JuliWooli said:

The problem isn't knowing the yardage.

It can be if you play on courses without accurate yardage markers or with elevation changes.

 

2 minutes ago, JuliWooli said:

Anyone can work that out close enough without a rangefinder.

Depends on the course you're playing. Sounds to me like you play on flat courses you know really well and with accurate yardage markers.

 

2 minutes ago, JuliWooli said:

There's wind, bounce, and other conditions that come into play

Of course. No one argued to the contrary.

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20 minutes ago, JuliWooli said:

I think the range finder we were born with is the best value and can be trusted. I've never come across a golfer who has an advantage over me using one of those contraptions. Fair play to the marketers however, plenty of golfers use them these days.

Never had one, never want to have one.

I played as a junior without  a range finder and gps was still many years off. We used yardage books and pacing for distances. Experience of a course helped a lot. I reckon distance measuring by GPS or laser is loads faster and also more accurate. It’s a big advantage, why would you not use it? 

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6 minutes ago, ncates00 said:

Strawman. Never argued to the contrary. Again--ever played courses with elevation changes?

 

It can be if you play on courses without accurate yardage markers or with elevation changes.

 

Depends on the course you're playing. Sounds to me like you play on flat courses you know really well and with accurate yardage markers.

 

Of course. No one argued to the contrary.

I can see how players could get accustomed to using them. I have never relied on them and am rarely surprised by their output when someone in my flight tells me, unrequested, how far I have to the pin. I don't pace out, I look at the markers and add or subtract a club or whatever. It works for me.

I do agree however that a course with elevation changes makes it trickier but does knowing the exact distance and elevation give you an advantage over a golfer who does it my way.

I'm not convinced. Let me say however that I do believe once you rely on them then you would struggle without. I've got enough in my bag, which I carry, without all the other extras.   

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19 minutes ago, JuliWooli said:

I'm not convinced. Let me say however that I do believe once you rely on them then you would struggle without. I've got enough in my bag, which I carry, without all the other extras.

That statement makes no sense. Actual, correct yardage trained the brain to put what you visually see to a number.

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1 hour ago, JuliWooli said:

I've never come across a golfer who has an advantage over me using one of those contraptions.

Then you haven't played with many (decent) golfers.

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Just now, saevel25 said:

That statement makes no sense. Actual, correct yardage trained the brain to put what you visually see to a number.

But I don't rely on actual, correct yardage. I'm just saying I personally don't think it gives an advantage. There may be some golfers who get the exact numbers from their device, add conditions and elevation, and hit their selected club solidly. However, It has not been my experience.

I would be first in the queue for one of them if I had witnessed/experienced that.

5 minutes ago, iacas said:

Then you haven't played with many (decent) golfers.

You could be right. Don't forget most of our members carry and use a range finder. I am just saying, IMO, that I don't feel any disadvantage playing against the best of them. 

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9 minutes ago, JuliWooli said:

But I don't rely on actual, correct yardage. I'm just saying I personally don't think it gives an advantage.

Laser range finders are accurate with in 1-3 yards. Better range finders being to with in a yard. So... I don’t get how you can say you are relying on actual yardage when a range finder is probably more accurate than the yardages placed on a golf course.

heck, I’ve seen sprinkler heads saying the yardage is 150 when it’s a 50 yard shot because they reused the sprinkler head.

Yea, your comment makes no sense.

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11 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

Yea, your comment makes no sense.

It makes no sense to you because you firmly believe that knowing the exact yardage gives you an advantage over a prehistoric like me who manages just fine without this technology. I rarely select the wrong club and, I repeat, don't feel at a disadvantage playing golfers who have the exact numbers. With a solid strike I am rarely wrong.

What are you failing to understand?

When I am visiting an unfamiliar course I'm usually a bit off and when a playing partner tells me the exact distance it doesn't make much difference because an unusual terrain needs time to become familiar to my senses. Unless my partner has played the same course before, he rarely has any advantage over me with or without a rangefinder.

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