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SoundandFury

So who remembers the R1?

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SoundandFury    17

I'm trying to understand TM's marketing efforts for it's flagship driver(s). Around Feb/March through the summer TM was touting the R1 as the be all end all of drivers, complete with huuuuuuge advertising push, marketing efforts, etc.  A bunch of their staffers played the R1 on tour and their bags and hats had the R1 logo all over them.

Cut to a month or so ago when TM releases the SLDR, and now it seems to be their only focus.  Tour players have ditched their R1's and I have seen YOUR1 poster anywhere.

What good does this do for them?  I get rolling out new woods every year, but 2x a year seems extremely excessive.  Same can be said about Callaways Razr Fit Extreme vs Optiforce.  On a more relatable note, this can't possibly inspire confidence in anyone to go out and pick up a new TM driver.  How can you justify dropping $399 on a club when you know something new and, according to the manufacturer, better is just around the corner.

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Ernest Jones    994

I don't really follow all the gear hype because I can't afford to upgrade anything but my grips anyway. I was under the impression that R1 and Razr Fit were for low cappers and the SLDR and Optiforce wear more GI oriented but these are all just assumptions on my part.

I would go with the more expensive one and buy some pants that match the colour scheme of the shaft graphics**.

** Tongue planted firmly in cheek . ;-)

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cipher    390
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones

I would go with the more expensive one and buy some pants that match the colour scheme of the shaft graphics**.

Wait...long pants or short pants? :-D

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Mr. Desmond    371

I still see the R1 in player's hands in tourneys.

It's nicely adjustable.

I don't even know if the SLDR head will fit me - not enough spin even at the highest loft with a 90 SS.

That said, of all drivers I demoed this year, for the regular Joe, the XHot is tough to beat with the correct shaft and loft.

But I did not try the G25.

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GaijinGolfer    84

It certainly seems to be working for them because they are able to convince people that they need to buy the newest stuff.  Every time TM comes out with something new, they spin it that they have completely reinvented the game, changed golf forever and that if you arent gaming their newest stuff, you are missing out.

Is it crazy?  Yup but its what gotten TM to where they are right now.  Their products really arent special from an engineering or quality standpoint.  What makes them stand out is their marketing and how they are able to convince customers to upgrade to newer gear all the time.

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jsgolfer    282

I bought the TM R1 tour earlier this year, it was the worst driver for me.  Seemed to be the "best" at golfsmith, but the Titleist  913 was the one I hit better on the course.  Much better, but I too wonder how the business case is made for having so many "new" drivers?

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PirateJim    28

While I'm sure there are some people that run out and buy new ones every time something fresh comes on the market, another angle that may be fruitful for TM is that golfers do, from time to time, decide to get some new sticks.  I suppose it helps if your company has a brand new life changing product that has been the topic of very recent media "buzz" rather than stale year or so old stuff that nothing new has been written about in months.

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GangGreen    19
While I'm sure there are some people that run out and buy new ones every time something fresh comes on the market, another angle that may be fruitful for TM is that golfers do, from time to time, decide to get some new sticks.  I suppose it helps if your company has a brand new life changing product that has been the topic of very recent media "buzz" rather than stale year or so old stuff that nothing new has been written about in months.

Agreed...particularly when your competitors are out their every year with their "new" products. I'm guessing none of the major manufactures want to be perceived as being behind so they tweak last year's model, repackage it, and viola...introduce the latest and the greatest. I guess if it works for the iPhone, why not golf clubs...haha.

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rkim291968    225

It's the same marketing scam as smart phone except they don't tie you to a 2 year contract.   Apparently, there are golfers buying new gear every year or two.   If you are one of those lucky ones who can splurge on new golf equipment every year, please do tell what you are getting out of it.

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grubby98    3
Lets see in the last 2-3 years they have had the R11, R11S, R1, and the SLDR. That means they are about due to have a new driver out sometime in Feb/March. I personally have the R11S, purchased Sept. 12, I will be playing it for atleast another year before I even start to think about getting new clubs. I went 12 years from my previous club purchase to that purchase. To me no reason to purchase new equipment unitl you start to see the clubs are improved enough to the such they will help your game.

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newtogolf    957

In terms of flagship, TMAG had the R1, R1 Black, then the SLDR.  Callaway had the RFE and OptiForce.  I think in both cases the companies were trying to boost their season ending sales with drivers that take advantage of new technology.  TMAG had the moving weight technology in the SLDR and the Callaway OptiForce included their new sleeve (patent deal with Titleist) that allows for more adjustment and is similar (if not exact) to the Titleist 913 sleeves.

I believe they were both test marketing and field testing new product concepts to see what the reaction would be before they went into final development for next year.  In terms of the OptiForce I expect Callaway to use this new sleeve for all their future drivers.  It gets them closer to what Nike and TMAG offer in terms of loft and face adjustability.  I also think Callaway expected to target golfers with swing speeds under 100 for the OptiForce but when Tommy Gainey threw it in his bag, it got a lot of people interested in it.

TMAG wanted to see how the SLDR technology would hold up and determine if too much dirt got into the track of the moving weights and how easily would the weight loosen up.

Next years products will likely be variations of these two and I also heard TMAG won't have a white driver in their lineup for next year.

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RonTheSavage    74
The over the top marketing makes me ill. And like the poster above stated TM is the apple of the golf world. Next up will be SLDR S which gives you 17 more yards by moving weights and adding a speed slot yada yada yada.

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The only good thing about frequent "new" driver introductions is that you can get the previous model (which is just as good) at a bargain price. Excess inventory must be dumped quickly so that the focus will be on the "new and improved" product. I've never felt the need to buy the "latest and greatest". For many years manufacturers such as Ping sold basically the same product with only minor year-to-year "tweaks" (The Eye 2, for example). Today's philosophy is to change a product often and make you think that last year's model is "obsolete".

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k-troop    228

This is probably why I instinctively prefer Titleist.  Flash and bang don't do much for me, and I just can't logically comprehend significant leaps being made in golf club technology every six months.  The fact that they release some "amazing new technology" every six months completely ruins their credibility in my mind.

I've hit everything they've released except the SLDR, BTW, and even owned a white hybrid.  Not a fan, but again I'll admit I've probably got a mental bias against TM clubs.

LOVE LOVE LOVE the Penta TP5 though.

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newtogolf    957

The over the top marketing makes me ill. And like the poster above stated TM is the apple of the golf world. Next up will be SLDR S which gives you 17 more yards by moving weights and adding a speed slot yada yada yada.

I agree, not a big fan of TMAG marketing.  Based on their marketing I should be driving the ball 450 yards.  Fact is COR is maxed out for drivers, this years models aren't any longer than last years when hit on the sweet spot.  Best gains you can get today comes from getting fitted for the right shaft and loft based on your swing.

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