Jump to content
IGNORED

Golf's Mental Game Aspect


iacas

Recommended Posts

34 minutes ago, Jack Watson said:

There's ideas I'd like to share here since I sort of promoted Gallwey.  I wholeheartedly believe in his ideas first off however they are based in tennis.  In tennis,  the racquet is essentially very 'light' in comparison to the golf club.  So,  imo the problems faced by the golfer physically are different to the problems faced by the tennis player.

In golf we all know feel is not real;  every teacher brings this up and it's very true.   Why?  IMO it's because of the club.  The clubs in golf are relatively long and the weight is at the end.  IMO it's tougher in golf to 'imitate' another swing vs in tennis.  It's physics.  In tennis I can imitate any players swing mechanics pretty well.  In golf it's far tougher because of the physics.  In golf the forces we are dealing with as we swing are much greater than in tennis where the tool is relatively short and light.  

I believe that it can be very tough in golf for example for an overswinger to shorten the swing.  That was my experience.  I simply failed to understand momentum.  You cant just swing back and stop wherever you want.  Absolutely you stop applying force at some point going back but there's momentum in the swing at that point and it carries the club further back past where you 'feel'.  The same effect is present coming forward.  The forces of the swing are what makes feel and real differ and it's what makes golf a different problem from tennis mechanically.  

So,  imo Gallwey's mental approach is still correct.  You can't think a swing.  You do however have to realize the fact that while you feel you are doing something,  it happens during other forces which make it a little more complicated.  

So,  people get confused when what they feel they are doing looks nothing like a result on video.

I felt it was important that I in no way discount the physical issues faced by the golfer.  

 

First of all, I don't think anybody thinks that you discounted the physical part of golf. The issue is the amount of emphasis on the mental part you put into it that surprises many people given your handicap and experience.

So, the essence of your argument is if someone like me could blame 3 or 4 lost strokes per round on a bad mental game. Could I, yes? Do I? No, because I can attribute every single bad shot I make to not having the skill to overcome an adverse situation.

For example, if I can carry my 7i 165 yards on the range with a nice and high trajectory, but on the course I get this pulled anemic 150 yard carry that rolls for another 20 yards so do I blame my inability to "take my driving range game"? No, I blame my inability to take into account the lie and my awkward body position. Do I feel nervous about hitting off an upward lie having to choke up 2" on my club even though it's the first time I have to do it? No, I just setup as best as I can as I do on every shot, take my practice swing, step up, and swing. Same as I always do. Could I have done it any better? Could I have had a better attitude about it? No. I didn't feel anything, no apprehension, no doubt that I could swing properly. Just made terrible contact. It's the norm. When I make a "picture perfect shot that I can sometimes make on the driving range", that's the exception for me at my current skill level. If I could hit perfect shots all the time, I'd be much better than I am. But that's a lot more work than thinking that it can be fixed "if only I could take my driving range game onto the course". It's not easy.

So, that's only one example of why I think my game is almost all >95% physical.

:ping:  :tmade:  :callaway:   :gamegolf:  :titleist:

TM White Smoke Big Fontana; Pro-V1
TM Rac 60 TT WS, MD2 56
Ping i20 irons U-4, CFS300
Callaway XR16 9 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S
Callaway XR16 3W 15 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S, X2Hot Pro 20 degrees S

"I'm hitting the woods just great, but I'm having a terrible time getting out of them." ~Harry Toscano

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

  • Moderator
18 hours ago, Ty_Webb said:

But what about the difference between two tour players? Do you think the difference between them is 5% mental and 95% physical? Why do you suppose peak Tiger was such a good closer compared to other players who were not?

Still physical. The top players on tour are generally longer and better ball strikers than the average tour player. Their swings produce better shots. Brooks Koepka has a swing that produces better shots than someone like Mark Wilson. Koepka can do things in his swing that Wilson can't do.

Tiger hit the ball higher, farther and closer to the hole than his competitors. He was able to hit shots round after round that most players on tour couldn't hit.

Who else in the game at this time had the physical ability to hit this shot? David Duval was a great player in '00 and it doesn't matter what his mental state was, he's not hitting this shot. Tiger had a clear physical advantage. Just look at how he played the '97 Masters. 

 

  • Like 1

Mike McLoughlin

Check out my friends on Evolvr!
Follow The Sand Trap on Twitter!  and on Facebook
Golf Terminology -  Analyzr  -  My FacebookTwitter and Instagram 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

As defined in the original post, of course golf is mainly physical.  It's a physical activity and those who are physically superior will have an overwhelming advantage on those of us who are not physically superior. 

But deviating from the definition in the original post, and perhaps because I am a nerdy non-athletic type who is always trying to learn how to play, I regard a very large part of playing golf as an intellectual, as well as physical, activity.   For a person like me, the golf swing has to be learned.  I need to know how to swing the club, why to swing it that way, how to get myself to do that.  And in the middle of the round, if I am playing poorly, I need to know what I am doing wrong, how to stop doing it, how to get myself back on track, how to get my mind to control my body. 

As I said, if we define the mental aspect of golf as it was defined in the original post, then of course golf is almost all physical.  But to me, that definition unfairly removes most of what I would call the mental aspect of golf.  I see a lot of physically superior guys hacking around out there because they refuse to engage in what I would call the mental aspect of golf: the learning, the study, the attempt to have the mind control the body, figuring it out. 

I can't argue with the original post.  But if someone asked me if golf was as much mental as physical, I would say yes, because I just define the question differently.   Heck, if golf didn't have a huge mental component, people wouldn't write books about it. 

But again, I know I am deviating from the terms set out in the original post. 

 

Edited by Marty2019
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

  • Administrator

@Marty2019 you can “mentally” know all the right things. All the info in the world. You’ve still gotta physically pull it off.

Also, Bubba Watson might not know much of anything about the swing. He knows less than I do. Yet he’s gonna have to spot me four or more a side for a fair match.

  • Thumbs Up 1

Erik J. Barzeski —  I knock a ball. It goes in a gopher hole. 🏌🏼‍♂️
Director of Instruction Golf Evolution • Owner, The Sand Trap .com • AuthorLowest Score Wins
Golf Digest "Best Young Teachers in America" 2016-17 & "Best in State" 2017-20 • WNY Section PGA Teacher of the Year 2019 :edel: :true_linkswear:

Check Out: New Topics | TST Blog | Golf Terms | Instructional Content | Analyzr | LSW | Instructional Droplets

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

4 hours ago, Marty2019 said:

As defined in the original post, of course golf is mainly physical.  It's a physical activity and those who are physically superior will have an overwhelming advantage on those of us who are not physically superior. 

But deviating from the definition in the original post, and perhaps because I am a nerdy non-athletic type who is always trying to learn how to play, I regard a very large part of playing golf as an intellectual, as well as physical, activity.   For a person like me, the golf swing has to be learned.  I need to know how to swing the club, why to swing it that way, how to get myself to do that.  And in the middle of the round, if I am playing poorly, I need to know what I am doing wrong, how to stop doing it, how to get myself back on track, how to get my mind to control my body. 

As I said, if we define the mental aspect of golf as it was defined in the original post, then of course golf is almost all physical.  But to me, that definition unfairly removes most of what I would call the mental aspect of golf.  I see a lot of physically superior guys hacking around out there because they refuse to engage in what I would call the mental aspect of golf: the learning, the study, the attempt to have the mind control the body, figuring it out. 

I can't argue with the original post.  But if someone asked me if golf was as much mental as physical, I would say yes, because I just define the question differently.   Heck, if golf didn't have a huge mental component, people wouldn't write books about it. 

But again, I know I am deviating from the terms set out in the original post. 

 

I don't think that's what this topic is about this at all, and some really fit looking people can't hit the ball as far as some really nerdy looking people. Golf is >95% physical for more than 95% of golfers who play regularly, but that doesn't mean you need to look like a super athlete to play well. Certainly not to play at your best.

The thread and it's predecessor thread are about how much emphasis you need to put on your mental game. This one is more about if you think mental game is more important than 5%, then please answer why? So far, no one has stated anything or cited precise examples as to why they think metal game is more than 5%. I think it's possible that it could be as much as 20% only because I don't exclude any possibilities, just like I still consider evolution a "theory" even though it's very strong, but so far I've not read any specific examples that couldn't be answered by a physical deficiency.

If we put this topic in a sport that most of can relate to like running. If I ran track in high school and could normally run a 400m anywhere between 50 seconds and 58 seconds depending upon the surfaces and conditions, and in one race I run a tough track in 50 seconds beating everyone then another where I feel like the competition is not so great and run it in 58 losing to everyone. 58 was my worst time and my normal range was 50 to 51. Was it my mental attitude? Some coaches think it is. I told my coach "I just didn't have it in me today." He said work on your "mental game". It turns out that hours before that race I had a leg press competition with some football players, and didn't feel the soreness until the following two days. My coach was so pissed off he made me run 800m runs for the remainder of the week and season. :-D

So, when you are not at your best, it's probably not your "mental game" as it was in my case running track and also playing golf.

I think lied about when I was a beginner in golf that I'd think it could have been 50/50 because I don't think I'd have ever thought that. If my swing was bad I always went to a coach to teach me to get better. I didn't meditate for hours, although that would have been better than beating 600 balls a day.

Edited by Lihu

:ping:  :tmade:  :callaway:   :gamegolf:  :titleist:

TM White Smoke Big Fontana; Pro-V1
TM Rac 60 TT WS, MD2 56
Ping i20 irons U-4, CFS300
Callaway XR16 9 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S
Callaway XR16 3W 15 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S, X2Hot Pro 20 degrees S

"I'm hitting the woods just great, but I'm having a terrible time getting out of them." ~Harry Toscano

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

12 hours ago, Lihu said:

First of all, I don't think anybody thinks that you discounted the physical part of golf. The issue is the amount of emphasis on the mental part you put into it that surprises many people given your handicap and experience.

So, the essence of your argument is if someone like me could blame 3 or 4 lost strokes per round on a bad mental game. Could I, yes? Do I? No, because I can attribute every single bad shot I make to not having the skill to overcome an adverse situation.

For example, if I can carry my 7i 165 yards on the range with a nice and high trajectory, but on the course I get this pulled anemic 150 yard carry that rolls for another 20 yards so do I blame my inability to "take my driving range game"? No, I blame my inability to take into account the lie and my awkward body position. Do I feel nervous about hitting off an upward lie having to choke up 2" on my club even though it's the first time I have to do it? No, I just setup as best as I can as I do on every shot, take my practice swing, step up, and swing. Same as I always do. Could I have done it any better? Could I have had a better attitude about it? No. I didn't feel anything, no apprehension, no doubt that I could swing properly. Just made terrible contact. It's the norm. When I make a "picture perfect shot that I can sometimes make on the driving range", that's the exception for me at my current skill level. If I could hit perfect shots all the time, I'd be much better than I am. But that's a lot more work than thinking that it can be fixed "if only I could take my driving range game onto the course". It's not easy.

So, that's only one example of why I think my game is almost all >95% physical.

I can't say at any time that the mental side absolutely accounts for x percentage of shots or x number of strokes per round.  It absolutely varies day to day shot to shot.

Also quitting on a bad round is out of the discussion on my end.  I used to get where I'd be playing bad and I'd give up and just start trying to smash Driver and hit crazy shots.  Anymore it's more fun to keep grinding after a bad start for me.  Playing a round is a commitment and I've had some pleasant surprises after some bad starts.  

On the range thing,  for me,  on the range,  I can do x with the ball.  I am warmed up,  perfect lie,  hitting shot after shot.  On the course I almost never warm up before playing and have to hit a shot I can hit just walking up cold.  For myself,  I call it my comfortable swing.  It's one shot.  No messing with things just my normal shot.  On course what works for me best is keeping it simple.  

The thing I have trouble relating to in your post is that if I took the attitude that I don't have the skill to hit a shot on course i.e. that I can't hit hanging lies,  I would be done for the most part before even swinging.  I would feel like I am mentally defeating myself before the shot even if what you say is true in a sense.  

It relates to what @Marty2019 said above.  He said something to the effect that since he has no athletic ability he needs to intellectually learn what how why,  basically everything technical and also (imo the worst thing to do on course) how to figure out exactly what's going wrong on course and correct it.  It's a very very common attitude you see from a lot of people on the internet who study golf.

All that information being fed into the conscious mind imo has almost nothing to do with learning about swinging a club.  You could have so much info that's of good quality and go and top and whiff all the shots because golf is a sport.  To me taking that attitude that you have to become an encyclopedia of mechanics in order to play golf is self defeating in most cases.  The basic premise that one lacks coordination or physical skill is simply untrue.  Everyone has some.  Furthermore,  trying to self teach in this informational way is imo conditioning you to tend to be the exact opposite of what Gallwey espouses or as it was said in the opening post 'being able to get out of your own way'.   People need to take advantage of good pros.  Info overload leads to paralysis by analysis.

Quick example of a misguided self teaching attempt in music was a guy I saw who was teaching himself bass guitar.  He first memorized all the notes on the fretboard.  This was before trying to do anything with the instrument!

Edited by Jack Watson
Link to comment
Share on other sites


1 minute ago, Jack Watson said:

The thing I have trouble relating to in your post is that if I took the attitude that I don't have the skill to hit a shot on course i.e. that I can't hit hanging lies,  I would be done for the most part before even swinging.  I would feel like I am mentally defeating myself before the shot even if what you say is true in a sense.  

I'm not mentally defeated. I feel perfectly confident that I can make my swing, just not necessarily great contact. I take the attitude "Swing my best, and hope it strikes well". You can play some pretty good golf thinning your shots to the green, so if you think that that's part of my mental strategy of "What? Me worry?" golfing then I agree it could be mental. I don't really give it much conscious thought. I think the most thought I gave was during a round back in my last outing because my partners depended upon me to score well. Every 3 putt was a nail in the coffin, and I felt kind of bad. Normally, I don't really give a crap about my scoring. I shoot and go, and end up with whatever score I get.

 

1 minute ago, Jack Watson said:

It relates to what @Marty2019 said above.  He said something to the effect that since he has no athletic ability he needs to intellectually learn what how why,  basically everything technical and also (imo the worst thing to do on course) how to figure out exactly what's going wrong on course and correct it.  It's a very very common attitude you see from a lot of people on the internet who study golf.

I wanted to correct that. You don't have to be an athlete or look like one to play your best game.

Why does it matter if your partners play at scratch and you play at 26? Handicap evens out the match. I have a co-worker who plays against a childhood friend who's a professional, and sometimes wins because he's got 40 strokes more than the pro. +4 versus a 36 :-D

That being said, why do people want to improve? Why does anyone want to improve? It makes them feel better to play at their best. The main thing is a swing that feels like you gave it your "all". Feels better than a flippy one where you feel really crappy and "incomplete". That's why we're all on this site. To help us play at our best, no matter what that is.

 

1 minute ago, Jack Watson said:

All that information being fed into the conscious mind imo has almost nothing to do with learning about swinging a club.  You could have so much info that's of good quality and go and top and whiff all the shots because golf is a sport.  To me taking that attitude that you have to become an encyclopedia of mechanics in order to play golf is self defeating in most cases.  The basic premise that one lacks coordination or physical skill is simply untrue.  Everyone has some.  Furthermore,  trying to self teach in this informational way is imo conditioning you to tend to be the exact opposite of what Gallwey espouses or as it was said in the opening post 'being able to get out of your own way'.   People need to take advantage of good pros.  Info overload leads to paralysis by analysis.

That's part of the argument. I don't overthink anything anymore. The mental game for me is pretty non-existent, even though I probably should think more. I don't. Golf is a fun and relaxing sport for me at this point, if I took that away then what's the point of me going out and beating balls across a field of nice and green grass? My son enjoys playing more now too, now that he's not playing for a team. Pressure is bad, why give yourself more?

:ping:  :tmade:  :callaway:   :gamegolf:  :titleist:

TM White Smoke Big Fontana; Pro-V1
TM Rac 60 TT WS, MD2 56
Ping i20 irons U-4, CFS300
Callaway XR16 9 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S
Callaway XR16 3W 15 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S, X2Hot Pro 20 degrees S

"I'm hitting the woods just great, but I'm having a terrible time getting out of them." ~Harry Toscano

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Let's just say,  Tigers greatness was in no way just simple physical advantage.  Listen here...he talks of everything slowing down feeling more calm (alpha brain waves?). He even mentions blacking out...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • Moderator

Tiger's D- game was still better than most players B game.  His consistency in his prime was unparalleled.  That is purely physical greatness.  On his bad "mental" days, he was beating most of the competition.

Philip Kohnken, PGA
Director of Instruction, Lake Padden GC, Bellingham, WA

Srixon/Cleveland Club Fitter; PGA Modern Coach; Certified in Dr Kwon’s Golf Biomechanics Levels 1 & 2; Certified in SAM Putting; Certified in TPI
 
Team :srixon:!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

7 minutes ago, Jack Watson said:

Let's just say,  Tigers greatness was in no way just simple physical advantage.  Listen here...he talks of everything slowing down feeling more calm (alpha brain waves?). He even mentions blacking out...

Its primarily a physical advantage. No one could do what Tiger did. 

Did he have a physiological advantage, sure. He wouldn't have that advantage if he didn't have the physical one. 

Matt Dougherty, P.E.
 fasdfa dfdsaf 

What's in My Bag
Driver; :pxg: 0311 Gen 5,  3-Wood: 
:titleist: 917h3 ,  Hybrid:  :titleist: 915 2-Hybrid,  Irons: Sub 70 TAIII Fordged
Wedges: :edel: (52, 56, 60),  Putter: :edel:,  Ball: :snell: MTB,  Shoe: :true_linkswear:,  Rangfinder: :leupold:
Bag: :ping:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

16 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

Its primarily a physical advantage. No one could do what Tiger did. 

Did he have a physiological advantage, sure. He wouldn't have that advantage if he didn't have the physical one. 

I don't know if you meant "psychological" or not, but either way you got the correct message through. :-D

Edited by Lihu

:ping:  :tmade:  :callaway:   :gamegolf:  :titleist:

TM White Smoke Big Fontana; Pro-V1
TM Rac 60 TT WS, MD2 56
Ping i20 irons U-4, CFS300
Callaway XR16 9 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S
Callaway XR16 3W 15 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S, X2Hot Pro 20 degrees S

"I'm hitting the woods just great, but I'm having a terrible time getting out of them." ~Harry Toscano

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

16 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

Its primarily a physical advantage. No one could do what Tiger did. 

Did he have a physiological advantage, sure. He wouldn't have that advantage if he didn't have the physical one. 

Hm...Explain this.  Amateur archers improve performance.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


1 minute ago, Jack Watson said:

Hm...Explain this.  Amateur archers improve performance.

 

Hey, I was an amateur archer. Ranked 61st nationally in the last competition I attended. It was pretty much all physical. My physical shooting was worse than 60 others. The Olympic level archers shooting side by side with us mortals didn't have a mental edge over the rest of us. They had more stable forms, better aim and better releases than the rest of us.

:ping:  :tmade:  :callaway:   :gamegolf:  :titleist:

TM White Smoke Big Fontana; Pro-V1
TM Rac 60 TT WS, MD2 56
Ping i20 irons U-4, CFS300
Callaway XR16 9 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S
Callaway XR16 3W 15 degree Fujikura Speeder 565 S, X2Hot Pro 20 degrees S

"I'm hitting the woods just great, but I'm having a terrible time getting out of them." ~Harry Toscano

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

46 minutes ago, Jack Watson said:

This guys pretty into this subject.  

Wow!

DRIVER: Cleveland 588 Altitude ( Matrix Radix Sv Graphite, A) IRONS: Mizuno JPX-800 HD Irons & 3,4,5 JPX Fli-Hi (Grafalloy Prolaunch Blue Graphite, R); WEDGES: (Carried as needed) Artisan Golf 46, 50, 53, 56 low bounce, 56 high bounce; PUTTER: Mizuno TP Mills 9

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 10/7/2017 at 2:44 PM, iacas said:

Choking is not entirely mental either. In fact it’s only a problem when the mental aspect of choking leads to physical differences.

The root cause is mental but I’ve seen people mentally choke and their physical skills on autopilot got them through.

Interesting viewpoint. I asked about this elsewhere, but I'm not sure that I got an answer, so I'm going to ask it in a different way.

Let's suppose that a player is playing the Players Championship. They are tied for the lead after 16 holes on Sunday. They take dead aim at the flag on 17 - the back right one. They push their shot 15 feet right of the flag and it goes in the water. That's basically two shots wasted right there. Would you say that was a mental error or a physical error? If it was a bit of both, what proportion would you say it was? Personally I would say that was about 80% on the mental side and 20% on the physical side. He's an idiot for aiming at that flag, but he also missed his target, so it's a little of both. 

Part of the reason that I'm surprised about the 5% for the mental side is I've been reading another thread on here (it's long, so I'm working through it slowly) about aiming at the middle of the green and not the flag from outside 100 yards. It seems like a lot of people are pretty foolish about where they aim. That's a mental issue and I'm surprised that it only contributes 1 shot in 20 shots difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • TST Partners

    Golfer's Journal
    ShotScope
    The Stack System
    FlightScope Mevo
    Direct: Mevo, Mevo+, and Pro Package.

    Coupon Codes (save 10-15%): "IACAS" for Mevo/Stack, "IACASPLUS" for Mevo+/Pro Package, and "THESANDTRAP" for ShotScope.
  • Posts

    • Welcome! I think this forum is a great place to learn more about the golf swing. There are of course a ton of resources out there to find with search engines, books, videos etc., but it can be a challenge to navigate it all for the best content. There's a lot of misinformation out there. This forum already has a lot of existing content and you can start new topics yourself. One thing a forum provides is discussion, different points of view and a place to put your thoughts into words. The best way to learn is often by teaching, because you have to know what you are talking about. Most of us aren't teachers, instructors or pros, but we can still discuss the golf swing, use the resources we find and put it into our own words. If we get it wrong, someone else may point it out. If you want to share, the Member Swings subforum is a place to post your own swing and get feedback. Technology has come a long way, and combined with dedicated people around the world, it's easier than ever to find accurate information. They use the best players in the world to find commonalities and distill the golf swing down to what is almost universally true for all the best players. That means to ignore Scheffler's feet, Furyk's octopus and other outliers, but focus on what they have in common. The essentials which amateurs should also try to achieve.
    • So I'm a 2 handicap and I know my golf swing is garbage but I also know I have a very very limited understanding of how the golf swing works. And I also know that I'm the type of guy that likes to dive ultra deep into topics I'm interested in. Like for example; The past few years I've learned video editing (specifically how to make videos that go viral on social media), and I've spent a lot of time just reading the manual that came with one of the video editing programs I use. (the manual is 4.5k pages, and obviously very indepth, but I've learned a ton with it.) So far to try and learn more about the golf swing I've read books + listened to podcasts/interviews with coaches/teachers combined with listening to great players talk/give clinics. Sometimes the teacher being interviewed talks about books that they really like, or coaches they look up to, and then I "travel down the knowledge tree" and try to look for those peoples interviews, content etc. Ex, An interview with Randy Smith led me to Chuck Cook, then Chuck Cook led me to reading the books by Jim Hardy (mainly the + and - book). I'm well aware that the knowledge I'm getting is surface level but again I don't really know where to "go" to learn in depth about the swing. To try and supplement the knowledge gap, I've made a set-up in my basement where I have two mirrors + a webcam I can use to film myself and dissect my own swing + watch pro swings and try to figure out what they do. But again, I know I'm not really getting the full picture. So my question is, is there a better place to go/process I could apply to learn about the golf swing? I know there's The Golfing Machine but isn't that mostly outdated information now, and there's no real updated version, right? I don't really want to hire a teacher, partly because I don't really trust most teachers (I've had some really bad experiences lol), and I want to be self-sufficient as a player. My line of thinking is, the better I can understand the golf swing, the better I can understand my own swing. Where do I go? Also I should note, I have a ton of time to devote to the game + the golf swing, I basically work from home and I'm in a very fortunate position where I have a very low living cost. Cheers.          
    • Day 43: Hit 20 balls with 6-iron, working with new feel. Seemed to work okay, but start line is a little more right than I’d like to see. Hit 15 Almost Golf balls with driver, same feel. Did pitching.chipping practice, focusing on good contact. Putted in home office for 20 min using my dog’s Kong as a target. 
    • Wordle 1,071 3/6 ⬛⬛⬛🟩⬛ ⬛⬛🟨🟩⬛ 🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩
    • Going to try breaking 50 from the opposite of the tips like Bryson 🙃
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...