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late347

What do you consider "bad greens"?

16 posts in this topic

I was playing the first round of the season together wiht my dad.

The grass was still kind of growin in the fairways. But sadly, at the greens the situation was somewhat similar. There were blotches of sandy ground in the green. The existing grass at the green was mostly sparse anyway. The greens were extremely dry it could be said.

It seemed as though the greens were really slow, the ball didn't roll at all. Not even many bounces or rolling from approach shots to the green.

Scores were not terribly great I'm afraid. I'm hoping to improve my handicap from beginner level to intermediate this year. I had been training in the winter indoors range.

However, I also suffered a mild ankle injury, in February (slipped at stairs) which put me out of sports for seven weeks duration. So, I've been doing ok with the ankle thusfar, e.g. in other sports such as badminton.

Golf however was seemingly difficult, once again. I guess, it just sucks to play the eighteen holes and not improve the handicap because of two really bad holes played. And many ruined putts, partially to blame to the greens in my amateur opinion.

Even regardless of that I made three pars, and one bogey, so I was kinda happy about that! I beat my dad on those holes. On one hole, I actually hit tee shot within half a metre of the flag. I made only par though, LOL!!!

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You have to be patient this early in the season and let the greens grown in.  It has been a difficult winter, but the green should recover.

Also, is that your real handicap?  Seems astronomically high for someone that made three pars.

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yea, that's the European handicap system for you, I suppose...

54 equates to the beginner handicap, which is the worst that the handicap can become. In American Golf Handicap the worst beginner handicap is 36, am I right?

And you lower it only by returning the scorecards etc...

I think I'm going to be aiming for bogey, especially in the local golf course near my area.

It's just that I often play with my dad, and he's actually much better golfer still than I am. He's intermediate golfer, and I'm really a beginner still in this game.

I'd like to play from the closest tees, available. (not to make this game any harder on myself than it needs to be LOL)

Sometimes I play too much similarly, to my dad's playstyle his shots are quite a bit more accurate, so I think I will be less aggressive in attacking the greens if I'm uncomfortable e.g. water hazards

I could post a swing video of my shots at an indoors range, but I'm terribly embarrassed to actually post this sort of footage!

I think we only got one video clip, of a successful shot taken, but it's better than none, I suppose.

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Easy.  Moldy spinach in the plastic bag been in the refrig 3 weeks.  That's bad greens.

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I'd say inconsistent greens are bad. They can be fast, slow, medium, whatever. But, if they're mowed inconsistently, it's a real pain to putt on. While I prefer faster greens to slower ones, hard as stone greens that need watered are really bad too.

As mentioned, you have to be patient this time of year. I'm just happy to be playing.

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For me, greens that are brown or have been recently punched are bad greens.  Unless you play high-end public courses or at country clubs, thats just something you have to deal with sometimes though.

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I don't even care these days. For what I pay to golf I don't expect perfect. Just try to get it close enough to 2 putt, and it starts with the shots that get me there. My "cure" for inconsistent greens is play as well as I can tee to green.

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This is a bad green.  The greens in Michigan got hammered this winter. Many clubs in the area "lost" their greens.  This is Warwick Hills.

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This is a bad green.  The greens in Michigan got hammered this winter. Many clubs in the area "lost" their greens.  This is Warwick Hills.

+1.. That doesn't look like fun at all!

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For me, greens that are brown or have been recently punched are bad greens.  Unless you play high-end public courses or at country clubs, thats just something you have to deal with sometimes though.

They punch the greens at high-end courses too..... ;-)

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They punch the greens at high-end courses too.....

What I hate is when the courses punches the greens at stupid times during the year. Last year the course I play punched them in mid to late November. They where not bumpy till MAY!!!! No way grass is going to grow back in fast when winter hits.

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My club is doing a Deep Tine Aerification which is supposed to recover in a matter of days rather than weeks. We'll see how well this works.

I hate greens that look like my teenager's face because other players don't repair ball marks or repair them incorrectly.

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Overgrown and bumpy, being a slow green is not necessarily bad either as long as they roll true and consistent, I think players insist too much on having fast greens while making the maintenance too difficult, I have noticed that the firmer and faster the green the worse pitch marks don't recover, I think this probably can be attributed to the public improperly fixing it, I think there is probably a middle ground somewhere that keeps this from being an issue.

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Overgrown and bumpy, being a slow green is not necessarily bad either as long as they roll true and consistent, I think players insist too much on having fast greens while making the maintenance too difficult, I have noticed that the firmer and faster the green the worse pitch marks don't recover, I think this probably can be attributed to the public improperly fixing it, I think there is probably a middle ground somewhere that keeps this from being an issue.

Most public golf courses I have played on have been about 8-9 on the stimp. Some can get up to 10's. I've only been on a 1 or 2 that have pushed past 11. Public courses are hardly ever that fast. Just for the reasons you stated, its harder to maintain, more expensive, and it probably would drive business away if people struggle putting the greens.

Pitch marks don't recover because people don't know how to repair them correctly.

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I love cheap golf best of all so every place I play has poor to terrible greens.  I'm kind of a connoisseur when it comes to bad greens.  Foreign grass or weeds poking up in spots is fairly common place.  Burned out, hard and dry in the summer - absolutely.  Probably the only thing consistent about them is their inconsistency.  You'll have one green that gets some shade that will be incredibly slow.  The next hole will have a green like a parking lot. This one place has really small greens that have become severely turtle-backed to the point where there is one par 3 that you absolutely can not stick the green in the summer when it's hard and dry.  All around this hole is overgrown brush.  It's quite common to hit the green and have it roll off and get lost.  It's very affordable, however.

Edit - I just remembered this one place nearby that is so bad it's the only place I won't play.  I should go and take pictures, it's hysterical.  It's a par 3 course laid out in the woods.  Due to overhanging branches there are almost no clear shots to the greens - you pretty much need to roll the ball along the ground.  The "greens" are just regular grass cut short-as-possible (with a regular mower).

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I recently played Lake Buena Vista and Magnolia while at Disney World. Had a great time at LBV, loved the course. Magnolia....not so much. A few weeks prior Magnolia had some damage to their greens. Most of the greens had the blue sand all over them along with patches of turf repair. Being that they charged over $100 and no beverage cart on the course, the experience was sub par to say the least. Felt great to knock one close but then arriving to the green seeing blue sand and turf squares all over the place was a downer. Oh well. Still had a good time and managed a 79. Course was used for "The Classic" with TW and Davis Love III being past winners.
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