Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Mike74

Can having the wrong clubs wreck your game?

33 posts / 6098 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

25 minutes ago, tinker said:

If you swing a 7 iron in the high 90’s you need stiff shaft, end of discussion. If you don’t use woods at all sounds like you swing so hard your swing is out of control. I’m a senior golfer and I can swing a 7 iron in the 90’s, I just couldn’t hit the ball decent no matter how hard I tried. 

Yes could be out of control but it does not feel that way. Just feels like the natural tempo for me. I have had some lessons and nobody is telling me I need to slow down. And when I do try to slow down thats when I really start spraying it all over because my hands and body get all out of whack. I think I need correct fitting with my irons to make sure I have no doubts when I’m standing over my shots.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me say something I've said many times before. In my experience, I have observed many times that a "regular" flex in a heavy shaft can be much stiffer than a "stiff" flex in a light shaft. I've seen this in both graphite and steel shafts. For example,  Dynamic Gold R300 is much stiffer than XP95 S300.

When people tell me regular works better for them than stiff (or viceversa), I always ask "in what weight shaft???"

Hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having an issues this year: I was fitted for clubs 4 years ago (1” longer/2 degrees upright). I am 6’3. Last season, I worked to change my swing. I used to hit a weak cut. I now, RARELY hit a ball left to right unless I am really trying to. I’m a 10 HC at this point. I have been hitting my driver and wedges fine. (Ping G25, SM7 both standard off rack). I am struggling pretty bad with my irons. My miss has been a hook or duck hook. Do you feel getting my clubs bent back down can fix this? I know it’s probably part of the swing but it’s pretty frustrating. Any feedback would be appreciated..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 4/16/2018 at 8:36 PM, tinker said:

If you swing a 7 iron in the high 90’s you need stiff shaft, end of discussion.

If he has a 7i SS in the high 90's he should probably look to get on tour. I think they would average less than 90 MPH. 7i SS is probably 80% of driver SS. His driver SS might be over 120 MPH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On ‎4‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 8:36 PM, tinker said:

If you swing a 7 iron in the high 90’s you need stiff shaft, end of discussion. If you don’t use woods at all sounds like you swing so hard your swing is out of control. I’m a senior golfer and I can swing a 7 iron in the 90’s, I just couldn’t hit the ball decent no matter how hard I tried. 

What make and model? That matters a lot as well. Shaft flex is not a universal measurement. It's highly inconsistent between brands and even between models for the same brand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 hours ago, ii3e22 said:

Having an issues this year: I was fitted for clubs 4 years ago (1” longer/2 degrees upright). I am 6’3. Last season, I worked to change my swing. I used to hit a weak cut. I now, RARELY hit a ball left to right unless I am really trying to. I’m a 10 HC at this point. I have been hitting my driver and wedges fine. (Ping G25, SM7 both standard off rack). I am struggling pretty bad with my irons. My miss has been a hook or duck hook. Do you feel getting my clubs bent back down can fix this? I know it’s probably part of the swing but it’s pretty frustrating. Any feedback would be appreciated..

A flatter lie angle will generally cause you to start the ball more to the right (assuming you're a righty). It won't fix a hook but it might make it more playable.

You should do a lie test. Draw a line on a ball with a sharpie and line it up vertical, then hit it. If then line transferred to your face isn't vertical, you need your lie adjusted.

You might have taken your swing path too far the other way from fixing your cut. Been there myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The thing is, IMO, you can't buy a golf swing. Most guys would be better off spending money on lessons from a good pro and developing a consistent swing that helps them make consistent solid contact with the ball, before getting into the weeds about shafts, and technical data.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a 20+ years layoff from golf I needed to re-examine my clubs which were in storage, 40 year old Wilson staff set, with persimmon woods, which I hit fairly consistently down to an 6 HC.  Not bad for a 3/month golfer.  Upon return I new it was time to upgrade.  To deal with all the changes in body and age, I went to a fitting, no brand or length or lie before hand.  I took a test with my 7i to get a base.  Let's start by saying it was not pretty as no serious muscle memory form was retained.  All of mu clubs had a very still True Temper.  My previous clubs were a bit long, especially the woods. Often week of restarting with my old clubs with mediocre results, I started rebuilding my set with 1" shorter shafts, senior flex, and a move to hybrids for my 2-5 old irons.  I felt as if a miracle occurred. In my case, as many years passed and I changed a lot, the equipment did a lot in making golf fun again, the fitting gave me a sense of what to look for as a base in rebuilding my current set of weapons.

To end this post let me say, while I now have a good set of clubs for me and my physical foibles, it has been instruction and a LOT of practice with those clubs that has allowed me to narrow the mis-hits, poor alignment, gripping the clubs, and line in hitting the ball.  The clubs have allowed me to eliminate them as a blame.  10+ strokes per round? Not ready to give the clubs that much credit; I am playing with more confidence and the clubs are a part of that.

Improving my. game is based on instruction and practice (with a good of clubs that work for me).

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thanks for the responses 

I agree with nearly every comment to some degree. From what i read above it is about having confidence in your equipment. If that be an old set from the nineties or a brand new set of custom fit clubs from today. You simply can not expect good results if you don’t 100% trust what’s in your hands and for everybody that will require a different level of investment. I do get regular lesson and my swing in general is good but my coach has told me that until everything is where he wants it, he would not recommend spending a lot on new clubs because my game is still a work in progress and the clubs I require at the end of that journey will be different from what might be recommended at the start. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might seem pendantic, but the only issue I have with this thread is the word ‘wreck’ in the title. I would change it to ‘limit’, ‘restrict’, and/or ‘complicate’, to make it a more correct hypothesis. 

The swing obviously has to be there, but poorly fit or unforgiving clubs will keep you from reaching your max potential. By how much is a function of how poor or poorly fit the sticks are, I think. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

If your coach is fine with your irons, and you trust your coach, then just use them.  I really doubt he would want you to continue if the clubs were hurting your swing.

And since you are only talking irons, I'm not sure how bad the dispersion would be between regular and stiff (I realize R, S and XS are not consistent between mfgs) to be the cause of spraying the ball.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I think so. Or it limits your progress.

Started with a Spalding graphite length +1 "set with a soft flex. Have had (private) lessons and the swing was correct (in the basics, on film: like path and turn etc.) Tried to learn to play with this set, because I convinced myself that you can learn to play with every set and once you play well and hit fairways it might be time to buy something new.

I have been playing poor for more than a year now and my pro said try something else, this isn't your setup. So I bought a second-hand TaylorMade RSi2 set with stiff flex last week and without changing my swing (and no lessons) played much much better last 3 rounds. Balls going straight and hit the fairway. Also a gain in length of about 50 yards with my i5.

Guess the old set was wrecking my game. 

Edited by Hamerhaai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remembered reading an in-depth Golf Digest interview with Payne Stewart in 1999.  This was shortly before he won his 2nd U.S. Open, and he was in the process of making a comeback after being in a slump for the previous few years.  They asked him about his equipment, and this is what he said"

G.D.  That long dry spell after the '91 Open wasn't so funny. What happened?

P.S.  The trouble started when I changed equipment companies back in 1992. I switched from playing a forged blade, which I had played my whole life, to an investment-cast club. At the same time, I switched from playing a wound ball to a solid ball. That was the big mistake, changing both clubs and ball at the same time. Neither one was right for me, but I didn't know that at the time. I thought maybe it was just the ball for a while, then thought it might just be the clubs. It messed me up good.

G.D.  Why change your equipment in the first place, at a time when you were one of the best players in the world?

P.S.  For one thing, when you're playing as well as I was at the time, you think you can play with anything. That isn't true, of course, but I didn't know it then. It also was a business decision. We were in the process of building a new home, and the contract was pretty lucrative. It gave me financial security, enough to be able to afford the house with no worries. But knowing what I know now, I would do it differently, because it cost me three years of my golf career. But there's still time. I'm 42 now, what I would consider prime time.

G.D.  What was wrong with the equipment?

P.S.  The two-piece ball I switched to spun too much. One shot would go the distance I thought it should, then the next one would fall short, and then the next one would go long. And they all felt the same when they came off the clubface. The ball just wasn't right for me.

The cast clubs were a big part of it, too. I found I wasn't getting that instant feedback I was used to with a forged blade. The sweet spot is a shade bigger, and when I didn't hit the ball dead center, I didn't know it, because it still felt great. So you start asking yourself, „What's wrong here? Is there too much offset? Is the sweet spot too big? Is it the ball? Is it my swing?'' It's enough to about drive you crazy.

For a while, I think in 1994, it got to where I didn't want to practice. I lost confidence and desire, because I didn't want to go out there and play poorly. I mean, at the time I would rather come here and sit on the lake than go practice and work on my golf game. Today I have a different philosophy.

Many of you may already know this, but in case you never heard the story, after his equipment contract expired at the end of '98, Payne actually did what most people do when they need new clubs...he drove to the local Edwin Watts store in Orlando and went shopping!  I'm not sure how many of the clubs that were in his bag were purchased there, but I know he bought a set of Mizuno irons, a bag and possibly a couple other clubs.  But I think this is an example of how having the wrong clubs (equipment) can wreck your game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 4/12/2018 at 8:25 PM, Mike74 said:

Ok I’m am convinced that getting fit for the correct clubs can help your game but until now I never considered the possibility that playing the wrong clubs can hinder your performance to a point where it really damages your whole game. I recently went and had a driver fitting. Before starting I was given a 7 iron to warm up with. After a dozen hits I had an average swing speed of 98mph with the 7 iron. Now 12 months ago when I got serious about golf I brought a secondhand set of cobra baffled irons with regular flex shafts. They are nice and easy to hit but as the year has gone on my consistency on the course had not improved and I am still only hitting about 30% fairways even though I only use irons. So I realise and have also been told by a couple of pros that these irons are not designed for me but for much lower swing speeds but not until the last week have a started to think that they may be the cause of my inconsistency. Has anybody else who had similar experience to me I would be great to hear from. I am really starting to loose confidence in my game.

Hey Mike,

I also agree with just about everything stated here. If you don't take the time to get the right club with the right length, weight and material, you are completely hosed. Additionally, the grip you have on the club can make a huge difference. The right grip can make the right club "perfect". To get the right club, you really need to see a professional in-person to figure it out. If you are looking for grips you can try https://www.golfpride.com/fit/ to see which of their grips might be best for your play style. Here is a video you can watch that might also give you some knowledge about different types of clubs. 

 

Edited by boatboy
Added video link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • TST Affiliates

    SuperSpeed
    TourStriker PlaneMate
    Golfer's Journal
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo
  • Posts

    • I'm an 18 HCP. My first game, I stopped counting. I went the lesson club fitting route. I'm not overly physically adept. I walk the course but not an athlete. Took it up 8 years ago. My wife and I get out up to 60 times a year. Got the fitted clubs 4 years ago. Loved the experience. Met a great guy. Went back and He fitted and sold me a driver. It took me 2 years after getting fitted to really start to feel the clubs. Last year I picked up a Ping eye 2 iron set for $100. They are 30 years old. I alternate with the modern set. I hit them about the same.  Of course, get a set that is the right size and fit. Meets your "shiny new toy" eye (thats important) and fits your budget...but there's no substitute for lessons and practice...and playing golf on the course.
    • Coorg Golf Links, Bittangala, Coorg, India Course Par 70 Men's Slope 67.3/117 Women's Slope 67.5/119 Championship Tees Hole 1 - Par 4 - 360 yards - SI 9 Straight hole.  Right side and over the back is OB.  Hit across a road which divides the front 9 and back 9.  Immediately across the road is a tank.  There is another tank on the right side.  Carry around 200 and you are over both the tanks.  On the left side of the fairway from 260 to 320 is another tank.  Hit 200 to 250 straight and you are good.  Green is slightly elevated but fairly flat Hole 2 - Par 3 - 149 yards - SI 11 Straight hole.  A tank on the left side till about a 100 yards.  Two bunkers in front and a gap between them.  Green slopes quite a bit Hole 3 - Par 4 - 360 yards - SI 1 About 200 yards straight.  Then a serious climb with a bit of a dogleg right.  The last 150 yards or so easily climbs 25 yards.  Around 230 yards is a road.  All along the right is OB.  Either hit it 200 yards till where it is level and then hit an uphill shot or carry it at least 240-250 and clear the road. A bunker on the left edge of the green.  Fairly small and reasonably level two tier green.  Maybe a difference of a foot or two between the two tiers Hole 4 - Par 3 - 143 yards - SI 13 Straight hole with an OB on the right and a drop off on the left.  The right side is a slope as well, but plants to keep the slope from eroding hold up balls hit there.  There is a bunker on the front right side and the green has a slope with an elevation change of three feet or so. Hole 5 - Par 4 - 305 yards - SI 5 Dog leg left. Hole goes up for 125 yards and then turns left and goes severely downhill (reckon 50 to 75 yards).  On the left side of the fairway is a hazard and on the right side is an OB.  There are some tall trees in the hazard on the left, which makes cutting the dogleg a bit of an issue. Hole 6 - Par 5 - 530 yards - SI 3 Dog leg right.  Hole goes up 250 or so yards (climb of 50 yards or so) and then turns right.  Down hill all the way from there to the green (drop of 100 yards or so.  The entire right side is OB.  About 100 yards short of the green cross the road (same as 3rd hole).  About 50 yards short of the green a tank on the left edge of the fairway.  Green has two bunkers in front.  Behind and right side drops off after the green. Hole 7 - Par 4 - 335 yards - SI 15 Slight dog leg left.  About 200 yards to the left.  Cutting the dogleg is problematic thanks to a tree in the relevant line.  Left downhill slope with trees and a tank.  Right uphill slope with trees.  After that OB onto the road (3rd and 6th hole) and beyond.  Green has two front bunkers. Hole 8 - Par 4 - 295 yards - SI 17 Straight hole.  Water body from 100 to 150 yards.  Two fairway bunkers on either side between between 200 and 250 yards.  Bunkers either side of the green.  Most of the left side of the fairway is wooded rough. Green slopes from back to front. Hole 9 - Par 4 - 365 yards - SI 7 Straight hole.  Tank on left of fairway from 250 to 350 yards.  Two bunkers in front of the green.  Green slopes from right to left.  A couple of yards past the green is OB. Hole 10 - Par 4 - 460 yards - SI 2 Bit of a dogleg left.  Left of the fairway is OB.  About 250 yards from the tee is a fairway bunker on the right side of the fairway.  One the right edge of the fairway are two tanks at 150 and 75 yards.  Left and beyond the green after 5 yards or so is OB.  Two bunkers either side of the front of the green.  Green slopes from front to back. Hole 11 - Par 3 - 160 yards - SI 18 Left of the fairway and behind the green is OB.  One bunker on the front left of the green.  Right of the fairway is a tank.  Green slopes from front to back. Hole 12 - Par 4 - 390 yards - SI 6 Slight dogleg left.  Entire left of fairway is OB.  Turns left around 225 yards.  Two bunkers in front of the green.  Behind the green slopes down and a tank about 5 to 10 yards past.  Green slopes from front to back. Hole 13 - Par 3 - 170 yards - SI 14 Left of the fairway is OB.  A tank stretching all the way till 20 yards before the green.  A bunker on either side of the front of the fairly level green. Hole 14 - Par 5 - 500 yards - SI 10 Dogleg right.  About 275 yards and the fairway turns to the right.  Trees lining the entire right side of the fairway, which makes going left on the fairway, right of the fairway onto the 12th fairway or long enough mandatory if you want to hit the green in two.  Front of the green has two bunkers.  10 yards over the green is a tank. Hole 15 - Par 3 - 170 yards - SI 12 Straight hole with bunkers either side of the green.  A bit of a drop off on the left of the green.  Both sides have some trees though far more on the left. Hole 16 - Par 4 - 360 yards - SI 16 Straight hole with fairway bunkers either side around 200 to 250 yards.  From a hundred or so yards in the fairway rises by about 5 yards and then levels out.  Green has a bunker on either side and drops off every side.  Slopes a bit from back to front. Hole 17 - Par 5 - 560 yards - SI 4 Dogleg right.  Left of fairway for tee shot is OB.  About 275 yards from the tee box is a tank on the right half of the fairway.  After the tank the fairway turns right.  The green has two bunkers in front and about 10 yards behind it is a tank. Hole 18 - Par 4 - 495 yards - SI 8 Almost straight hole.  At the end of the fairwayof about 450 yards, the green is on the left side another 50 yards or so, and raised up by 10 yards or so.  However, it isn't really a dogleg because you can hit the green from almost any point on the fairway.  The green has two bunkers at the right and back. On the left and front, it is a slope.  Back and right long is OB.  One part of the green is quite steep and it is a two tier green.
    • Weight was definitely the most important factor for me when I changed shafts.
    • This is the best ans(w)er. Shafts generally do the same thing, but sometimes they do it different.
    • Day 173 Worked on a transition feel for palmar flexion today. Gave the 7-iron a break and hit 4-iron, 5W, and 3W. Also slowed down back swing a little bit to make sure I can feel the stretch in my right hamstring/glute when turn is complete. Finished with a couple LW full swings, both of which went over the net into oblivion. 
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Blog Entries

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Kman74
      Kman74
      (46 years old)
    2. kuyarey
      kuyarey
      (39 years old)
    3. Marc Krikke
      Marc Krikke
      (51 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...