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FrivolouslyWasted

Ball Striking Is Improving, but Scores Are Not

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On 10/10/2018 at 4:46 PM, FrivolouslyWasted said:

Even when I do seemingly everything in my power to take the worst outcome out of play,

That's your issue.  You were focusing on the potential for a bad outcome.  Always think about where you want that little white devil to go and not where you don't want it to go.  If you do the latter, you already hit a bad shot before you've even swung the club from a psychological standpoint.  Stop doing that and you just might be surprised.  Keep it positive mate. 

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On 10/17/2018 at 8:54 PM, Hacker James said:

not scientific, but I read an article somewhere claiming the brain will disregard certain words in context. For example, you might say or think "Do NOT hit in the water"....The brain then ignores the negataive modifiers DO NOT, and therefore is left with "Hit in the water".  Or DON'T go right...….and of course you GO RIGHT.

My idiot brain does this, I think. Played 9 yesterday and while I didn’t lose any OB or in the water, I did manage to place my drives on the bad side of almost every dogleg fairway I played. 1st hole - can’t miss left or trees block the green. So I snap hook my drive left. A few holes later, trees block the green to the right, and I push my drive right.

 

The scores are starting to come down though. Perhaps I was being a bit impatient. I’m definitely reducing my really bad strikes, although bad habits still creep back in more than I’d like. Yet again I had quite a few really good strikes, just not enough club. Now that I’m gaining confidence in my swing, especially with my irons, I need to start turning up the power a little bit. 

 

Driver and wedges are probably what what I need to work the most now. I’m fairly content with the progress in my full swing irons and putting. I’ll probably get a net in the near future so I can work in the backyard through the winter

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On 10/17/2018 at 8:54 PM, Hacker James said:

not scientific, but I read an article somewhere claiming the brain will disregard certain words in context. For example, you might say or think "Do NOT hit in the water"....The brain then ignores the negataive modifiers DO NOT, and therefore is left with "Hit in the water".  Or DON'T go right...….and of course you GO RIGHT.

 

24 minutes ago, FrivolouslyWasted said:

My idiot brain does this, I think. Played 9 yesterday and while I didn’t lose any OB or in the water, I did manage to place my drives on the bad side of almost every dogleg fairway I played. 1st hole - can’t miss left or trees block the green. So I snap hook my drive left. A few holes later, trees block the green to the right, and I push my drive right.

I agree with @Hacker James, this type of thought pattern can make you focus on the trouble, and most of us tend to hit it where we're focused.  Its completely logical to analyze each shot, and decide where the trouble is.  But the next step is to decide where you DO want the ball to go.  Once you've decided that, you can safely forget about the trouble, do your best to put it out of your mind.  Concentrate on your golf, the spot you've decided to hit the ball.  

Beyond that, I too like LSW, there's lots of great advice in evaluating your game, planning your practice time, and evaluating each shot you'll hit.  Good luck!

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34 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

But the next step is to decide where you DO want the ball to go.  Once you've decided that, you can safely forget about the trouble, do your best to put it out of your mind.  Concentrate on your golf, the spot you've decided to hit the ball.  

Agreed. There’s a difference between considering trouble and focusing on it.

I’d go as far as saying that focusing too much on trouble might even make us over-compensate to avoid it. Happens almost every time someone is standing close to my target.

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1 hour ago, JonMA1 said:

Agreed. There’s a difference between considering trouble and focusing on it.

I’d go as far as saying that focusing too much on trouble might even make us over-compensate to avoid it. Happens almost every time someone is standing close to my target.

To build on that, and what @DaveP043 said, yeah, i think all the time "Okay, left is a pond and OB, so anywhere right is good."

I don't totally buy that "your brain can't process 'no' instructions."

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On 10/19/2018 at 9:57 AM, DaveP043 said:

I agree with @Hacker James, this type of thought pattern can make you focus on the trouble, and most of us tend to hit it where we're focused.  Its completely logical to analyze each shot, and decide where the trouble is.  But the next step is to decide where you DO want the ball to go.  Once you've decided that, you can safely forget about the trouble, do your best to put it out of your mind.  Concentrate on your golf, the spot you've decided to hit the ball. 

Yea, this is exactly what I meant by not thinking about it once my shot is selected. I've already shifted my shot zone away from trouble; the next step is focusing on hitting the ball where I expect it to go. Barring an egregious error (which happens), I won't be in trouble with my chosen shot.

The trouble is no longer on my mind because it's no longer expected to be in play.

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Update: it’s coming along. I perhaps need to be a bit more patient. 

 

It’s all about getting rid of the bad holes, staying focused and calm and not rushing myself. I’m absolutely getting better, but occasionally bad habits creep back in and they tend to cost me.

 

Today’s round is a perfect example. I went to the range to warm up, and was striping the ball really well. Then I went to play my round, and everything went wrong. My front 9 was so bad I quit keeping score. 

 

I regrouped mentally at the turn, and I started playing the golf that I’m always expecting myself to play. My first 6 holes on the back were bogey, par, double, and 3 consecutive pars. If I could have merely bogeyed the last two holes I would have shot 43 for the 9, which would have been far and away my best 9 ever. Instead I closed with consecutive 8s. I was 5 over through my first 7 holes on the back, and I played the last two holes in +8. I just couldn’t keep my last two tee shots in the fairway. Hit them both badly off the toe and hooked them. 

 

There was a lot of good to take away, especially on that back 9. It’s encouraging that I’m starting to string together long streaks of solid play (to my standard at any rate). The ball striking is definitely improving, but two bad swings of the driver cost me dearly, along with a couple of poor wedge shots. 

 

A few stats for the back nine: 5/8 fairways - missed the first and the last two, all left

3/9 GIR + 2 nGIR

4 pars, 1 bogey, 2 doubles, 2 quads 😞

18 putts- 1 one-putt, 1 three-putt, 7 two-putts

 

When I kept my tee shot in the fairway, I either had a GIR or nGIR. I’m playing pretty well from the fairway, but the rough can really penalize me. Most of my bad wedge shots also come either from green side rough, or bunkers. I’m still learning to adjust to the different types of lies I get in the rough, and my bunker play is all over the place.

 

The improvement with my irons over the course of the year has been very noticeable. I also putt decently, though there’s room to improve especially on speed. The driver and the wedges are what cost me the most strokes. Before my long hiatus from the game, my wedge play was pretty good, so I’m confident I can get that back. Driver has been the albatross of my game for most of my life. 

 

If I cut these last few bad swings from my rounds I think my scores will come way down.

 

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27 minutes ago, FrivolouslyWasted said:

If I cut these last few bad swings from my rounds I think my scores will come way down.

No, I don't "think" your score will drop.  I know they will drop.  Hank Haney Cool-Aid: "What's you're big miss" approach and I can dig on that.  Blow up holes destroy rounds. We all have them in one form or another. I actually flew with Charles Barkley when he was on the phone with Hank before they shot the series.  We had an interesting conversation until he asked me what my handicap was.  Mine is nothing to brag about ( and don't believe it should be used as a blunt instrument to prove your view is correct ) but the conversation mellowed out.  Shame the focus has to be on that sort of thing when it's not about that.  Good luck with your game man!!  

Edited by RST Rebuild

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On 10/19/2018 at 12:04 PM, iacas said:

I’d go as far as saying that focusing too much on trouble might even make us over-compensate to avoid it. Happens almost every time someone is standing close to my target.

Spot on!

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FrivolouslyWasted,

Are you drinking on the course? That could affect your performance.  Seriously though, if only we could measure and account for everything when we have a blow up hole.  I think that our bodies and minds go in and out during a game.  We may think we are fine, but our back and legs have become more tense, which affects our swing. Some tips to try are to practice purposeful breathing and relaxation between shots, stay hydrated, eat a snack.   

Did you change your strategy on the blow up holes?  I'm working on discipling myself to play the same and not get overly confident at times and go for the green on two.

 

 

Edited by greatgolfahead

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50 minutes ago, greatgolfahead said:

Seriously though, if only we could measure and account for everything when we have a blow up hole.  I think that our bodies and minds go in and out during a game. 

It's just probability. A higher handicap golfer has a much higher probability of hitting a bad shot, which then makes it more likely to put back to back bad shots together. They are more likely to end up with penalty strokes, or end up in a bunker, which compound the issue. Nothing mental will allow that high handicap golfer to play better outside of realizing they need to practice the correct way.

52 minutes ago, greatgolfahead said:

Did you change your strategy on the blow up holes?  I'm working on discipling myself to play the same and not get overly confident at times and go for the green on two.

Gameplanning is important, but you can bit aggressive and safe at the same time. Advance the ball as far as possible taking out high probability of hitting the ball into a hazard/bunker. It is also knowing your shot zone.

 

 

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47 minutes ago, greatgolfahead said:

FrivolouslyWasted,

Are you drinking on the course? That could affect your performance.  Seriously though, if only we could measure and account for everything when we have a blow up hole.  I think that our bodies and minds go in and out during a game.  We may think we are fine, but our back and legs have become more tense, which affects our swing. Some tips to try are to practice purposeful breathing and relaxation between shots, stay hydrated, eat a snack.   

Did you change your strategy on the blow up holes?  I'm working on discipling myself to play the same and not get overly confident at times and go for the green on two.

 

 

As I have gotten better and more serious about my golf, I’ve been cutting back on the consumption on course. At the start of the year, golf was a fun opportunity to goof off outside with a few beers. Now I’ll typically bring two, but usually only drink one.

 

I’ve gotten better about opting for lower risk plays, especially if I've already played myself into trouble. Where overconfidence can rear up for me is after a string of good shots, I start feeling good about my swing and don’t stay properly focused. Then I seem to let my old swing habits creep back in.

 

I still need to film a swing to put on here. I’m sure there’s still things I can improve on, but I definitely think my new swing is way better than the one I started the year with. I’m playing to my expectations more frequently and for longer stretches and I feel like there’s a big drop in my scores just around the dogleg. Bummer that after all year of working on it, it’s starting to show right as it’s getting cold.

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On 10/24/2018 at 6:51 PM, FrivolouslyWasted said:

 

 

It’s all about getting rid of the bad holes, staying focused and calm and not rushing myself. I’m absolutely getting better, but occasionally bad habits creep back in and they tend to cost me.

 

Today’s round is a perfect example. I went to the range to warm up, and was striping the ball really well. Then I went to play my round, and everything went wrong. My front 9 was so bad I quit keeping score. 

 

I regrouped mentally at the turn, and I started playing the golf that I’m always expecting myself to play. My first 6 holes on the back were bogey, par, double, and 3 consecutive pars. If I could have merely bogeyed the last two holes I would have shot 43 for the 9, which would have been far and away my best 9 ever. 

😞

You and I sound alot alike. I can get from the tee to the green just fine, but it's just too many bad shots, bad drives, bad chips, chucked 40yd wedges, 3 putts that kill my score. I've quit keeping score several times after a few holes. And last week I quit altogether on the 5th hole. 

I shot a 43 on 9 a few weeks ago, which is by far my best 9 ever, but subsequent 9s there have been 47, 47, 53, and today 50. I hit the ball pretty good I feel, just too make mistakes in the short game is mostly what ruins my scores 

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6 hours ago, paulballs said:

You and I sound alot alike. I can get from the tee to the green just fine, but it's just too many bad shots, bad drives, bad chips, chucked 40yd wedges, 3 putts that kill my score. I've quit keeping score several times after a few holes. And last week I quit altogether on the 5th hole. 

I shot a 43 on 9 a few weeks ago, which is by far my best 9 ever, but subsequent 9s there have been 47, 47, 53, and today 50. I hit the ball pretty good I feel, just too make mistakes in the short game is mostly what ruins my scores 

Well that's the life of a high hcper :) I can shot in the low 40s and high 50s on the same day. If I eliminate water and OB then I'm not scoring over 50, that's for sure. A few good drives and putts and I'm in the low 40s. A couple of OB/water hazards and a couple of 3 putts and I'm well over 50.

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