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Is complaining about course conditions "conduct unbecoming a professional"?

Poll Results: Is complaining about course conditions "conduct unbecoming a professional"?

 
  • 44% (8)
    Yes
  • 55% (10)
    No
18 Total Votes  
post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 

It seems to me that complaining about course conditions definitely falls into the category of Conduct Unbecoming a Professional.  These are supposed to be the greatest golfers in the world and should be able to handle not-quite-ideal (or even far-from-ideal) conditions.

 

With players getting on Twitter to complain (http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golftalkcentral/vegas-qualifier-site-receives-scrutiny-from-players/) about courses, should the PGA start issuing warnings?  I don't think the complaints are worthy of fines or suspensions but they definitely reflect negatively on the players and tour.  

 

At this point, it would be refreshing for someone to step up and say "The conditions today aren't ideal but you play the course as it is."


Maybe the PGA could just have mandatory "Twitter training" on how not to be an ass in 140 characters.

post #2 of 41

My two cents is that some courses are intentionally tricked up to make it harder for the pro's to score.  There's a fine line between setting a course up to be challenging for the pro's versus near impossible to score on.

 

While some might not want the pro's to throw darts and score really low on their courses, pro's don't want to look like fools because of  how the course was setup either.

 

I personally don't mind hearing comments from the pro's, some of it may be self-serving but if that's how they feel why should they be censored or fined? 

post #3 of 41

Id say it certainly is.  Everyone has to play in the same conditions, so why complain?  In the case of some players, Phil, for example, they are just whiners and always find something to complain about when things arent going their way.

post #4 of 41

I see nothing wrong with players expressing their opinions. This is America, right? Looking at the photo of one of the greens, I could see why they might be upset. I would be upset if that were the conditions at a local muni, much less a qualifier where my livelihood depended on my play.

 

Sure, everybody played the same course that day, but the conditions should somewhat simulate what the players would find at the tour stop. And judging from the photo, they certainly did not.

 

View image on Twitter

post #5 of 41

It depends on the nature of their complaints, the specific content, but generally, I vote no.

 

I like it when people express their opinions, and dislike things that prevent them from being shared. We do this to celebrities and famous golfers all the time.

post #6 of 41
Thread Starter 

The "this is America" argument is too simplistic.  The practical aspects of getting through life means that we can't always say what we want, even if it's a legitimate opinion.  No one walks up to their boss and says, "ho-ly, your daughter is UGLY".  Or, while meeting with a potential customer says, "I hope you buy our product even though I wouldn't... it's total crap."

 

These guys are professionals representing the PGA.  They can hate the conditions but they should be complaining privately to the people that could actually do something about it.  Complaining about it on Twitter is unprofessional, in my opinion.

post #7 of 41

I voted no.  They are the best in the world and they expect the course to be up to professional standards.  They have to win or play well to earn their money.  If poor course conditions could cause random issues that affect their scores, they have a legitimate gripe. Other professional athletes in all other sports do the same.

post #8 of 41

As long as the language and tone is appropriate and, well, professional, I have to say no.

post #9 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

It depends on the nature of their complaints, the specific content, but generally, I vote no.

 

I like it when people express their opinions, and dislike things that prevent them from being shared. We do this to celebrities and famous golfers all the time.

In general I agree.  I don't really care if celebrities voice their opinion about anything.  I'm actually more bothered when they backpedal after getting negative press for saying something stupid.

 

In this recent case, though, the players were more than just voicing an opinion.  They were pretty snarky in their criticism and that, I believe, goes beyond "voicing an opinion" and reaches "unprofessionalism."  If they had said something like, "conditions were pretty rough today" and included the picture, I wouldn't have thought twice about it.

post #10 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
 

As long as the language and tone is appropriate and, well, professional, I have to say no.

I agree, they are professionals, so their comments can be critical but they should also be professional.

 

I don't get this mentality that just because they all have to play the same course no one should say anything negative, this country has gotten way too politically correct.

post #11 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

I agree, they are professionals, so their comments can be critical but they should also be professional.

 

I don't get this mentality that just because they all have to play the same course no one should say anything negative, this country has gotten way too politically correct.

 

QFT....!

post #12 of 41

I voted no.  The picture Harmonious posted, which is from the story in the OP, and the basis for this thread, I presume, is pretty appalling, and they should be speaking up.  Could you imagine missing out on qualifying for a PGA tour event by a shot because your putt bounced off of an aeration hole?  Those aren't putting greens, that's Plinko!

 

On the other hand, I don't have much sympathy for guys who complain about US Open course conditions, or the greens being too fast or too slow for their liking, or the rough too long or too short, or whatever.  I think they should certainly be permitted to say it, but I am also permitted to form a negative opinion of them for doing so, if I so choose. :)

post #13 of 41

Voted no. I have no problem with it. Rub of the green, I know, and they all have to play on it, but this is part of the PGA Tour. Besides, he isn't complaining and saying it cost him a spot. He's just pointing out that he expects better, although not so sure about Joe Ogilvie.

post #14 of 41

Baseball players would complain if the infield was full of pebbles. Professional golfers would complain if the greens were bumpy. I complain if the greens are bumpy.

 

It's one thing for the course to be set up so it's real hard, but still fair. It's another if the course is just not in good shape.

post #15 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by krupa View Post
 

It seems to me that complaining about course conditions definitely falls into the category of Conduct Unbecoming a Professional.  These are supposed to be the greatest golfers in the world and should be able to handle not-quite-ideal (or even far-from-ideal) conditions.

 

With players getting on Twitter to complain (http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golftalkcentral/vegas-qualifier-site-receives-scrutiny-from-players/) about courses, should the PGA start issuing warnings?  I don't think the complaints are worthy of fines or suspensions but they definitely reflect negatively on the players and tour.  

 

At this point, it would be refreshing for someone to step up and say "The conditions today aren't ideal but you play the course as it is."


Maybe the PGA could just have mandatory "Twitter training" on how not to be an ass in 140 characters.

 

I happen to agree with you.  One of the two most fundamental principles of the game is that you play the course as you find it.  Since it's the same for all, they have no leg to stand on.  It comes down to my main gripe about the Tour, and that is that they are too pampered.  A couple of blades of grass out of place and they ask for relief - and half the time they get it.  They have lost touch the the game of golf.  

post #16 of 41

Tough call for me. I rarely would feel sorry for pros after the crap courses that I've played too many times to count where the impossibility of making a putt was the least of the problems.

 

But... I've never played on greens that bad for anything more than $20 plus greens fees.

 

Usually even the bad courses get things in decent shape (relatively speaking) for special events like tournaments.

 

All things considered I'll give them a pass for whining about this one.

post #17 of 41

Play it as it lies!

 

These are supposedly the best professional golfers in the world. They should be able to play under any and all course conditions that are not intrinsically dangerous (i.e. lightning, hail, destructive wind). Trouble is they are prima donnas. Whine and cry if circumstances present a real challenge. The same challenges we poor amateurs face daily.

 

But give them perfect lies and gorgeous weather they will certainly accept, and claim mastery of the course.

 

Phhhht!

 

Golf is an outdoor game. The best prepared course will be affected by the whims of nature.

 

Man up, girly men!

 

Play on.:-P

post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

I happen to agree with you.  One of the two most fundamental principles of the game is that you play the course as you find it.  Since it's the same for all, they have no leg to stand on.  It comes down to my main gripe about the Tour, and that is that they are too pampered.  A couple of blades of grass out of place and they ask for relief - and half the time they get it.  They have lost touch the the game of golf.  

I don't really disagree with you ... but I would say that playing a PGA tour qualifier on greens that were just aerated and are partially dying is a little bit beyond the "play the course as you find it" realm.

 

I mean, if you have Augusta National on one far end of the spectrum and your local run down, dilapidated, mini golf course on the other end of the spectrum (you wouldn't watch a PGA tour event at Boomers, would you?) somewhere along that scale it crosses over from acceptable playing conditions to not.  Agreed?  Seems like this situation is pretty darn close to being across that line, if not definitely across it.


Edited by Golfingdad - 10/16/13 at 11:33pm
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