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Do you remember all the shots in your round? I have a tendency to only remember the long game.

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

When you replay your round, postmortem it immediately after or later, do you remember all your shots? For some reason, I more easily forget the putts, which way they broke, etc... But off the tee and approach shots, I clearly remember those, no problems. The only putts I remember are the ones that I got mad at myself for missing. I wonder if it's psychosomatic? When I get to a point where I am somewhat satisfied with my long game, I'll focus more on the short game.

post #2 of 23

I usually remember them all.  

post #3 of 23

I usually remember them all, even from previous years.

 

My fiancee thinks I'm crazy and she can't understand how I can forget things but I can remember every shot I've pretty much ever taken on most courses.

post #4 of 23
I can remember them all for a few days and after that only the really good or really bad. I think it's more important to learn from your overall game though, like how many times you got up and down and GIR's etc.
post #5 of 23

It's been claimed that Moe Norman could remember every shot and score he ever made on a golf course during his lifetime. I guess being a "savant" has its' advantages!

post #6 of 23

I can remember specific holes when the shot meant something to me. Like number 18 at Brook side in Canton, Ohio. Needed an birdie to break 80 on an old Donald Ross course. I hit a drive in the fairway, pulled a 6 iron and put it to 20 feet above the hole. Then I 3 putted for par :p

 

Another one was one of the best rounds of my life. Driver to the left side of the fairway, pitching wedge to 10 feet, knocked in the birdie putt for a 1 over 73.

 

Usually I can remember recent rounds for a few weeks. Mostly its just memorable holes that hold some emotional significance to me.

post #7 of 23

Many players can remember every shot and score of the entire foursome in the entire round.

On the other hand, many players can not remember how many shots they make on just a single hole..........

 

One of the most important things I try to remember, is watching ever players putt on the green.

When you play the same course on a repetitive basis, this will come in handy as you will learn the characteristics

of the greens, knowing which putts roll in which directions.

 

Club Rat

post #8 of 23

I remember all the good shots whether they be full swings, sweet little pitches or in-all-the-way putts. I replay them in my head over and over while waiting for my next opportunity to play. For the bad shots I perform an exorcism and bury the remains deep in the forest where they will never see the light of day again.

 

Good shot memories build confidence and let you swing freely.

 

Bad shot memories kill confidence and create doubt.

post #9 of 23

I don't recall them all but I pick a few good and bad ones and think about the result and what caused that result.  What did I do wrong or right, what can be done next time to have more good ones, and minimize the things that went wrong?  For intance the last time I played I pull hooked two shots badly off the first tee. It is generally my "big miss"  I thought about it on the next tee and about what I did wrong, comitted to the change, and did not miss another shot like that the rest of the day. I think you do need to look at the bad shots, don't worry about the result, just think about what caused it and then focus in on improving the cause.

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post
 

I don't recall them all but I pick a few good and bad ones and think about the result and what caused that result.  What did I do wrong or right, what can be done next time to have more good ones, and minimize the things that went wrong?  For intance the last time I played I pull hooked two shots badly off the first tee. It is generally my "big miss"  I thought about it on the next tee and about what I did wrong, comitted to the change, and did not miss another shot like that the rest of the day. I think you do need to look at the bad shots, don't worry about the result, just think about what caused it and then focus in on improving the cause.

I get what you mean but...

 

drifting off topic here... (Click to show)

for myself I find it's better to ignore a bad result and just do it right next time. Clearly I did something wrong, hence the bad result, but trying to figure out what it was, particularly when I may not commit the same error on my next shot seems counter-productive. Perhaps if a pattern emerges over a series of shots but not for an occasional miss. This is more about in-round, obviously you want to work on your "miss" and your bad tendencies and priority piece at the range but the is a whole 'nother kettle of fish.

 

Manuel De La Torres once wrote, "Do you know what you are trying to do? Does it work when you do it?", if the answers are yes, keep doing it.

 

 

I agree that it's good to have an awareness of what your misses are that cost you strokes so you know what to work on, I just avoid remembering them in great detail as that can get in your head. I'm aware that I have a tendency to push my shots when I miss but I try to keep it an awareness as opposed to a vivid memory, if that makes sense.

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

 

I agree that it's good to have an awareness of what your misses are that cost you strokes so you know what to work on, I just avoid remembering them in great detail as that can get in your head. I'm aware that I have a tendency to push my shots when I miss but I try to keep it an awareness as opposed to a vivid memory, if that makes sense.

Makes sense.  We are all so different in how we need to approach things. 

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

I get what you mean but...

 

drifting off topic here... (Click to show)

for myself I find it's better to ignore a bad result and just do it right next time. Clearly I did something wrong, hence the bad result, but trying to figure out what it was, particularly when I may not commit the same error on my next shot seems counter-productive. Perhaps if a pattern emerges over a series of shots but not for an occasional miss. This is more about in-round, obviously you want to work on your "miss" and your bad tendencies and priority piece at the range but the is a whole 'nother kettle of fish.

 

Manuel De La Torres once wrote, "Do you know what you are trying to do? Does it work when you do it?", if the answers are yes, keep doing it.

 

 

I agree that it's good to have an awareness of what your misses are that cost you strokes so you know what to work on, I just avoid remembering them in great detail as that can get in your head. I'm aware that I have a tendency to push my shots when I miss but I try to keep it an awareness as opposed to a vivid memory, if that makes sense.

 

Trying to forget is definitely one way to avoid the bad thoughts.  I think the better approach is to detach yourself from past results.  Sort of like remembering without judging yourself for them and without thinking that its connected the current shot.  Then you can remember and use that information, without the "bad thoughts" getting in the way.  

 

Then again I heard a story that Jack once said he never missed a put with the match on the line.  Of course he did, but he didn't remember it.  Probably purposefully.  So you have Jack in your corner.

post #13 of 23

As soon as I get home, I review the scorecard again for what I did wrong.   I remember all my bad shots and regurgitate and make a note on which area to work on.   If I had a bad putting round, I will practice putting more, etc..   E.g, yesterday, after a poor driving round on Wed, I went to range and focused on hitting good drives. 

post #14 of 23

I remember all of the shots from the last three or four rounds, and sometimes more than that, if I replay the round in my mind. My wife lost her 3 hybrid on the course last week and couldn't even remember the last hole she used it on. I can't relate to that at all.

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

I agree that it's good to have an awareness of what your misses are that cost you strokes so you know what to work on, I just avoid remembering them in great detail as that can get in your head. I'm aware that I have a tendency to push my shots when I miss but I try to keep it an awareness as opposed to a vivid memory, if that makes sense.

 

^^^This. Thinking back a few years ago with some of the rounds I've played (especially in tournaments) I only distinctly remember the good shots or even good holes. I don't necessarily avoid remembering bad shots, but I guess I focus more on remember the good shots. I remember reading an article on GD within the last couple of years about a journalist asking Jack about a bad shot he hit in a tournament during his prime and Jack says he can't remember any of that. If you ask him about hole 16 at August in 1986, he will probably tell you everything in great detail down to how hard the win was blowing, how far his son was standing, etc. I sort of do the same thing. 

 

Also, rather than trying to figure out what you did wrong on a bad shot, why not just try to remember what you did right on a good shot? I tend to think too much if I'm trying to figure out what I did wrong on a bad shot and I possibly implement bad swing thoughts mid round on trying to fix it. 

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPMPIRE View Post
 

 

Also, rather than trying to figure out what you did wrong on a bad shot, why not just try to remember what you did right on a good shot? I tend to think too much if I'm trying to figure out what I did wrong on a bad shot and I possibly implement bad swing thoughts mid round on trying to fix it. 

 

Hmmm.   It's a concept that I need to think of adopting.    It's so obvious but like any typical male (subjective observation), I am intent on fixing what is broken rather than keeping what I do well.  

post #17 of 23

When I have a good round and I keep my focus, I can remember every shot, but it seems that when I lose that focus I cannot recall anything. For example, last week I booked my tee time for 9:03, when we arrived I went in to the pro shop and the girl behind the counter told me that we couldn't go out because the ladies league were going to make the turn, I said, why did you book me in then?

After a lot of discussion, the manager said we could go out on the back nine and just fall in behind the ladies that were just going through as there was a gap opened between them and the group behind.

I went five over through the first three holes, and finished that nine with a 44, we got to the front nine and all the ladies league had finished and cleared out. the guy on the cart with me said to just hit the reset button in my head and my focus will come back. I birdied the 1st, pared the 2nd, birdied the 3rd...... and shot even par 36 on the front for a gross 80. Now I can remember every shot and putt for that nine, but not a thing about the back nine.

post #18 of 23

I think that you remember the parts of the game you thoroughly understand, I don't understand putting yet, so I can't remember my putts except the long ones that went in, mostly by chance. I remember the well struck iron shots because I love watching them, the bad ones that I hit right for reasons I don't understand as of yet, are just a blur. I think your clue is this sentence:

 

" When I get to a point where I am somewhat satisfied with my long game, I'll focus more on the short game."

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