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ChetlovesMer

ClicGear, Sun Mountain, CaddyTek???

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2 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

Main reason is that the course where I play most of my golf is excessively hilly, and I am noticeably less fatigued carrying compared to walking. It's a specific fatigue/soreness in both my achilles/lower calves and glutes that only occurs when using the pushcart on this particulary hilly course. When I play a flat/flatter course, I take the pushcart.

I would think if you did it more often your legs would strengthen and this wouldn’t be a problem.

Our legs are built to take on heavy loads like that. Our backs not so much.

4 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

Secondarily, I commute to/from work daily by bike, so my wife is basically the sole proprietor of our car, except on the weekends when I golf, and the rear storage compartment of our Subaru Outback (which isn't tiny) is always filled with kids crap, like bikes, scooters, etc., and I'm often too lazy to unload the car at 6am to fit my pushcart in the car, but my clubs fit nicely in the back seat.

I load most of my stuff in the car the night before a round. The only things I’m bringing out in the morning are my golf bag and my water bottle.

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29 minutes ago, billchao said:

I load most of my stuff in the car the night before a round. The only things I’m bringing out in the morning are my golf bag and my water bottle.

My clubs, cart, shoes are always in my trunk... ready on a moment's notice.

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9 hours ago, ChetlovesMer said:

I could NOT disagree with this statement more. 

In my experience the weight of your bag makes a MUCH bigger difference than the slight difference in weight of the push cart. Having said that I use (and love) a ClicGear 3.5+. I used to use a lightweight carry bag on it. I recently switched to a huge Sun Mountain C130 bag which I have loaded down with half of everything I own. I don't think I've noticed a difference at all between what I used to be pushing around and what I'm currently pushing around. Even though, I know my new huge bag and kit are about 10 pounds heavier than my old little bag and kit. 

In my opinion (opinions are like assholes, everyone has one) the most important option in a push cart is to have a brake release handle NOT a toe activated brake. Again, this is one man's opinion, but I find the toe operated brake annoying and the handle infinitely better. 

 

9 hours ago, iacas said:

If the wheels aren’t well lubricated it can feel heavier. It might be more that than an extra pound.

 

6 hours ago, billchao said:

I was thinking along these lines. The wheels are going to have a bigger effect on how much force it takes to push it than the 2 lbs of extra weight.

 

6 hours ago, Darkfrog said:

I've used a Clicgear and Bagboy triswivel. I didn't notice much difference in weight pushing between the two because the rolling resistance is low, but I liked that the Bagboy was lighter and folds smaller, which is nice for getting in and out of my garage/car, so I ended up keeping the Bagboy.

The Clicgear felt much sturdier, and I like that replacement parts are available on their website for when something does break, but I probably carry more than 90% of my rounds, so I don't put much mileage on the cart, so I doubt I'll wear out the Bagboy.

I know that the Clicgear has its fans, and I will never criticize their build quality. They are a very well made product. 

However, the things are not as nimble or easy to maneuver, and it's nothing to do with the lubrication of the wheels. I'm talking about brand new carts, sitting side by side in Golf Galaxy, pushing them empty thru the store. The SM Speed is just easier to maneuver, steer, push. It's like night n day to me.

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30 minutes ago, billchao said:

I would think if you did it more often your legs would strengthen and this wouldn’t be a problem.

Our legs are built to take on heavy loads like that. Our backs not so much.

I'm not sure what it is, it's perplexing. I don't think it's strength/conditioning. When I had a clicgear a couple years ago, I used it every round for a whole season (all year in Cali) and it didn't improve. I'm a pretty avid cyclist and hiker. I go on long bike rides and mountain hikes with way more elevation change and steeper grades than a round of golf. But for some reason pushing a cart up hills for 3-4 hours causes specific soreness after a couple hours. Maybe it's a stretching/flexibility/ergonomic issue. I'm really tempted to try out a powered push cart, but that would significantly cut into the golf budget, and I'd prefer to pay for lessons and improve my game.

6 minutes ago, Double Mocha Man said:

My clubs, cart, shoes are always in my trunk... ready on a moment's notice.

 

37 minutes ago, billchao said:

I load most of my stuff in the car the night before a round.

I wish I could do this. There's enough property crime in and around my neighborhood that it would only be a matter of time before a drug addict broke into the car and took anything that looked remotely valuable. I've had a picnic blanket stolen from the back of my car, which isn't a big deal except that the thief had to smash the rear windshield to get it. 

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26 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

I'm not sure what it is, it's perplexing. I don't think it's strength/conditioning. When I had a clicgear a couple years ago, I used it every round for a whole season (all year in Cali) and it didn't improve. I'm a pretty avid cyclist and hiker. I go on long bike rides and mountain hikes with way more elevation change and steeper grades than a round of golf. But for some reason pushing a cart up hills for 3-4 hours causes specific soreness after a couple hours. Maybe it's a stretching/flexibility/ergonomic issue. I'm really tempted to try out a powered push cart, but that would significantly cut into the golf budget, and I'd prefer to pay for lessons and improve my game.

Maybe it’s a mobility or flexibility issue, specifically with your ankles. Climbing up and down hills while pushing and holding a weight is more stressful than simply going for a hike.

That could at least explain your Achilles/calf soreness. As far as your glutes, I hear you just need to get them activated when you play golf.

30 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

I wish I could do this. There's enough property crime in and around my neighborhood that it would only be a matter of time before a drug addict broke into the car and took anything that looked remotely valuable. I've had a picnic blanket stolen from the back of my car, which isn't a big deal except that the thief had to smash the rear windshield to get it. 

Sorry man, that sucks. I suspected this was a possible issue when you said you load everything at 6:00 AM.

I live in a pretty quiet neighborhood, but I still won’t leave my golf bag in my car overnight.

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10 hours ago, Double Mocha Man said:

My clubs, cart, shoes are always in my trunk... ready on a moment's notice.

So basically golf’s version of a Minuteman!

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On 7/10/2020 at 7:45 PM, billchao said:

Maybe it’s a mobility or flexibility issue, specifically with your ankles. Climbing up and down hills while pushing and holding a weight is more stressful than simply going for a hike.

Took the push cart out today, and did some ankle/calf and upper leg stretches for about 20 minutes before teeing off, and periodically throughout the round, and it made a difference. Guess I'm old enough where I have to stretch before golf now.

On 7/10/2020 at 7:45 PM, billchao said:

Sorry man, that sucks. I suspected this was a possible issue when you said you load everything at 6:00 AM.

Yeah, my neighborhood is actually a nice neighborhood, but in Oakland there's a large unhomed/mentally ill/addict population, and crime of opportunity is common to the point where police don't even bother investigating. It's a systemic issue, with no solution on the horizon, so I just take necessary precaution with things I don't want to have stolen out of my car.

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11 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

Yeah, my neighborhood is actually a nice neighborhood, but in Oakland there's a large unhomed/mentally ill/addict population, and crime of opportunity is common to the point where police don't even bother investigating. It's a systemic issue, with no solution on the horizon, so I just take necessary precaution with things I don't want to have stolen out of my car.

Are the "things" in view or hidden in your trunk?

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1 hour ago, Double Mocha Man said:

Are the "things" in view or hidden in your trunk?

A common subject on my neighborhood Nextdoor is smash and grab car burglaries, and often the OP will say something to the effect of "I even hid my laptop under the seat and it still got stolen" or "I just parked and ran into my friend's house for 5 minutes..."

Super annoying aspect of living in an otherwise decent place.

I've got a station wagon, so unfortunately everything in the rear storage area is in plain sight. There is a retractable cover, but I feel like covering stuff almost makes it look like something valuable is being hidden. I do have a driveway, so our car is always parked off the street, and hasn't been subjected to the same amount of pointless vandalism as others in the neighborhood. Now there are even more sophisticated thieves rolling through neighborhoods in vans and quickly cutting the catalytic converters off of Priuses (apparently they are valuable) with cordless sawsalls.

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1 minute ago, Darkfrog said:

A common subject on my neighborhood Nextdoor is smash and grab car burglaries, and often the OP will say something to the effect of "I even hid my laptop under the seat and it still got stolen" or "I just parked and ran into my friend's house for 5 minutes..."

Super annoying aspect of living in an otherwise decent place.

I've got a station wagon, so unfortunately everything in the rear storage area is in plain sight. There is a retractable cover, but I feel like covering stuff almost makes it look like something valuable is being hidden. I do have a driveway, so our car is always parked off the street, and hasn't been subjected to the same amount of pointless vandalism as others in the neighborhood. Now there are even more sophisticated thieves rolling through neighborhoods in vans and quickly cutting the catalytic converters off of Priuses (apparently they are valuable) with cordless sawsalls.

I am fortunate I live in a very good neighborhood.  On 4 occasions since I bought my new car last August I have leaned against the kitchen counter, or something similar, and accidentally pressed the key fob in my pocket and opened my trunk... for all driving by to notice my approximately $3000 worth of golf gear in my trunk.  I'll usually discover it an hour or so after the trunk has been open.  No, I'm not giving out my address.

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Well sherpas uses backpacks to get their gear up even when there is roads. Get more traction that way which helps versus having to use your arms to push a weight in front of you? I also find it easier to carry my clubs up the few hills then to drag my cart. I have not tried a push cart yet but doubt it will be any easier with my wheelbarrow experiences 🙂

My back don´t like my carrying every other day so now debating 3 or 4 wheeled. On relatively flat terrain is there such a big difference in balance of them? My old 2 wheel pull cart I could use in the forests with quite good success but that is out of the picture I understand with both 3 and 4 wheel variants.  Another incentive not to go OOB.

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3 minutes ago, knott said:

My back don´t like my carrying every other day so now debating 3 or 4 wheeled. On relatively flat terrain is there such a big difference in balance of them? My old 2 wheel pull cart I could use in the forests with quite good success but that is out of the picture I understand with both 3 and 4 wheel variants.  Another incentive not to go OOB.

Three is preferred for maneuverability, four for stability sometimes. Sometimes the threes have a larger front to back distance. Three often fold up smaller.

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1 hour ago, iacas said:

Three is preferred for maneuverability, four for stability sometimes. Sometimes the threes have a larger front to back distance. Three often fold up smaller.

Thanks. Going to try out this one. Didn´t break the bank 🙂 


Bullet Golfwagen 5000 Professional, klappbar mit mit leicht-klick-System Silber fÃŒr Golftaschen/Golfbags: Amazon.de: Sport & Freizeit

 

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2 hours ago, iacas said:

Three is preferred for maneuverability, four for stability sometimes. Sometimes the threes have a larger front to back distance. Three often fold up smaller.

The Sun Mountain Micro cart (4 wheel) folds smaller height-wise, but wider length and width. The Clicgear 3.5 and 4.0 fold to a smaller length and width, but slightly taller. Both fit easily in my Jeep. I would recommend the Clicgear over the Sun Mountain after using both. Although they are both excellent carts.

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47 minutes ago, knott said:

Thanks. Going to try out this one. Didn´t break the bank 🙂 


Bullet Golfwagen 5000 Professional, klappbar mit mit leicht-klick-System Silber fÃŒr Golftaschen/Golfbags: Amazon.de: Sport & Freizeit

 

I recommend the same thing for push carts that I do for tripods: get the best from the start. You’re going to end up there so you may as well save yourself the money time and frustration.

Plus push carts don’t cost thousands of dollars.

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2 hours ago, iacas said:

Three is preferred for maneuverability, four for stability sometimes. Sometimes the threes have a larger front to back distance. Three often fold up smaller.

I had both a 4 wheel, and a three wheel, and liked both. I really didn’t notice a difference in maneuverability, but the 3 wheeler was slightly easier to push. 

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Got my Bullet 5000 today. It should do the job I believe for as long as I live besides the brake possibly. 

Very lightweight but hopefully not to lightweight. It appear to be designed well enough. Holds my carry bag well despite the legs. the handle of my wilson carry bag is perfectly placed to lift the entire cart together with the carts handle if needed. 

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On 7/10/2020 at 7:12 PM, Darkfrog said:

I'm not sure what it is, it's perplexing. I don't think it's strength/conditioning. When I had a clicgear a couple years ago, I used it every round for a whole season (all year in Cali) and it didn't improve. I'm a pretty avid cyclist and hiker. I go on long bike rides and mountain hikes with way more elevation change and steeper grades than a round of golf. But for some reason pushing a cart up hills for 3-4 hours causes specific soreness after a couple hours. Maybe it's a stretching/flexibility/ergonomic issue. I'm really tempted to try out a powered push cart, but that would significantly cut into the golf budget, and I'd prefer to pay for lessons and improve my game.

 

I wish I could do this. There's enough property crime in and around my neighborhood that it would only be a matter of time before a drug addict broke into the car and took anything that looked remotely valuable. I've had a picnic blanket stolen from the back of my car, which isn't a big deal except that the thief had to smash the rear windshield to get it. 

I have a garage and I still unload my clubs when I am not playing. In my neighborhood they'd definitely get stolen if I parked outside with my gear in the back. I have a hatchback and not a trunk so it's easy to see what's in the back.

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