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How did you fix your slice?

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When I start slicing, it's usually because I am bringing up the club too high (for me) in my swing. I bring the club back flatter (think Kuchar) and for some reason that gets my swing back  on track.

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My swing has been coming along nicely recently. I can now hit all my irons without slicing, something I've *never* been able to do.

There was no single thing that fixed it for me. I'd say everything I did recently to learn how to get into a better impact position contributed in some way.

However, I do think there was a range session that proved to be something of a catalyst for improvement. I was at the range one day, slicing away and getting frustrated, and as happened every so often hit one that pull hooked sharply instead of slicing. This got me wondering why that happened sometimes. Just for kicks I then took a few shots where I felt like I was keeping the clubhead very closed far into the backswing (the thought going through my head was "keep the club face looking at the ball"). This initially resulted in consistent pull hooks, but after a while I started hitting quite good looking shots instead.

As I said, this was just a catalyst and I've watched enough videos of pros to know that most do not actually keep the face closed in the backswing. But this change resolved some roadblock in my mechanics, and since then I've been able to work harder on very specific things like getting my weight forward, without needing to rely on my band aid fix. I finally feel like I've got a shot of actually being able to play this game some day without making a fool of myself.

I'm not sure if my rambling will be helpful to anybody else. Maybe the only message for other frustrated slicers out there would be this: yes, it can be fixed :)

(Then again, maybe the message should be that I should have just taken a few more lessons instead of going on my journey of self discovery :blink: )

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I've done two things to help with my slicing this week. First I adjusted my grip slightly, and secondly I started with my hips pointed forward at adress. It seems to be helping.

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I never seem to slice irons but a driver is a different story.  Actually I'm not even sure if it's a slice anymore, looks more like a push.  Either way I need to get to the bottom of it.

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I cought on to mine quite early and I am glad. Focused on keeping some pressure with my left hand pinky on the club and a solid wrist/straight arm at impact. If I hit a slice I can feel that I didnt keep my pinky pressure on the club. Its wired into my swing now

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I never seem to slice irons but a driver is a different story.  Actually I'm not even sure if it's a slice anymore, looks more like a push.  Either way I need to get to the bottom of it.

Yeah, I don't slice with my irons, either, just with woods. Under normal circumstances if I concentrate, I normally won't slice but as soon as I get confident and swing without thinking the ball starts straight and then starts making that dreaded right turn.

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I may have sorta fixed my driver problem today.  I angled my spine toward my back foot a little bit and tried to do.. what felt like keeping some of my weight on my back foot but I think maybe I was just keeping my head behind the ball, and I was nailing drives nice and straight while swinging fairly hard at the ball.  I was getting most of the drives out to 250 according to the cart GPS and up to 285 when hitting slightly downhill.

This spine angle thing makes me suspicious, is it a crutch for newbies and not actually the best way to setup and hit a driver?

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This spine angle thing makes me suspicious, is it a crutch for newbies and not actually the best way to setup and hit a driver?

It's actually a great way to hit the driver, just "bump" the hips a few inches at address.

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Years ago I had a bad slice that would show up at the worse times and result in a big number on that hole. I finally bit the bullet and decided to take lessons from one of the Pro's at my club. It was the best thing I ever did. :-D

Larry (Pro) untwisted me and got my stance square & grip back (not weak) where it belonged. He showed me on video how my clubface was wide open in my backswing and how I held the face open through out my swing.

Oh!!! the other thing was, I went to the practice facility as much as I possibly could. I was determined get better.

I still take a handful of lessons from Larry every winter season. In fact, I look forward to them. We have lunch and occasionally get out on the course together for a $2 Nassau .

And, if you think it's going to cost a lot of money you are wrong. The money I saved on buying new Drivers trying to solve the problem with equipment paid for the lessons 10 fold. In fact, I'm still hitting my R7 driver right up or past my buddies with new R1's and loving it :-P That's how much money over the years I saved.

IMO take lessons from a Pro. You may not play well during the transition, but when it clicks, golf becomes a lot of fun.

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Tell me how to hit one please!! pretty much hooking it off the tee.

Basically it comes down to the swing path, the most common movement for a slice

is an out to in swing path. If you can get the feeling the clubhead comes more from the inside

it will help you to cure that slice

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When I first started.. I had about a 50-60 yard slice every time. To play college golf I had to get rid of it.. I found something that fixed it after 3 range sessions.

1: Set up to the ball with your feet together and the ball in the middle. So feet should be touching

2: Move your right foot(if you are a righty) back to your normal stance.

3: Put your club face IN THE MIDDLE of your stance. The ball should still be forward.. you should be about 6 inches away from the ball. The whole idea is to have the club where the bottom of the swing should be so you can start hitting up on the ball.

4: Don't look at the ball.. Only focus on the spot where your driver is at. You can put a tee in the ground to look at, but if you make a decent swing, your club will connect with the ball. It will finish the turn for you.

5: Open your front foot just a little.

PS- If you start hitting a hook, move the driver head closer to the ball.

The key is not looking at the ball in your follow through. Focus on the spot that is supposed to be the bottom of your swing. Staying balanced will really help.. if you start to sway you can throw off your COG and it will completely change the swing path. Meaning you will keep the face open or lean back some.

Other things- Make sure you are turning through and sometimes it is because the swing is too upright. I would try and turn more around your body.. I don't have any swing to look at so not easy to diagnose but everyone I have shown this drill it has worked.

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Quote:

When I first started.. I had about a 50-60 yard slice every time. To play college golf I had to get rid of it.. I found something that fixed it after 3 range sessions.

1: Set up to the ball with your feet together and the ball in the middle. So feet should be touching

2: Move your right foot(if you are a righty) back to your normal stance.

3: Put your club face IN THE MIDDLE of your stance. The ball should still be forward.. you should be about 6 inches away from the ball. The whole idea is to have the club where the bottom of the swing should be so you can start hitting up on the ball.

4: Don't look at the ball.. Only focus on the spot where your driver is at. You can put a tee in the ground to look at, but if you make a decent swing, your club will connect with the ball. It will finish the turn for you.

5: Open your front foot just a little.

PS- If you start hitting a hook, move the driver head closer to the ball.

The key is not looking at the ball in your follow through. Focus on the spot that is supposed to be the bottom of your swing. Staying balanced will really help.. if you start to sway you can throw off your COG and it will completely change the swing path. Meaning you will keep the face open or lean back some.

Other things- Make sure you are turning through and sometimes it is because the swing is too upright. I would try and turn more around your body.. I don't have any swing to look at so not easy to diagnose but everyone I have shown this drill it has worked.

This is also how I set up to the driver (head in the middle of my stance, not at the ball).  I look at the ball though.  When I waggle pre-shot I waggle to the middle not the ball.

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This is what I did to fix my slice that I just worked out a few weeks ago.

1) I put the ball slightly forward in my stance.

2) Slight shaft lean forward.

3) After I address the ball I take a deep breath and exhale before bringing the club back.

4) I bring the club low and slow straight back keeping my arms straight until my arms and body turn in unison and a lighter grip pressure. Feet must be flat on the ground and not let them roll over in either direction (this is hard to correct without alot of practice)

5) As I rotate back I let my right leg straighten out slightly and the right elbow folds slightly

6) I start the downswing from this position with an easy tempo keeping my head behind the ball and my right shoulder going towards the target line. This also let s the club come from the inside so there may be a slight draw sometimes.

7) Hit through the ball and rotate to the finish position with belt buckle pointing at target and hands high.

This has worked for me unless I forget to bring the club straight back which leads to 30,000 lbs of bananas or if my grip pressure gets too tight on my left hand it turns into the Happy Hooker.

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It's actually a great way to hit the driver, just "bump" the hips a few inches at address.

Right but that seems like maybe it's cheating the proper way to hit the ball; by cheating I mean doing your hip slide before you even hit the ball.  In either case it seems to be working for me.  If I should be addressing the ball with more of a neutral stance and sliding my hips into that position during the swing I would like to learn to do it that way that is I guess what I'm saying.

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Shorten your driver shaft by 2 inches and leave it in the trunk of your car.

I agree with the first part of that sentence. I chopped off two inches a few years ago, and this year I've been choking down another full inch (at least) on the club. I've never drove the ball so well in my life. I'm reading a lot advice suggesting get flatter, but I think getting too flat was a problem of mine. Which, I suspect, was a result of the driver length. With my driver at this length, I can turn my shoulders on an angle that feels pretty similar to a 4/5 iron.

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