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What breaks down in your game towards the end of a round?

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Just kind of wondering when you get tired (either physically or mentally) what part of your game breaks down?

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Honestly usually disappointment. Once I've gotten to the point where I am certain I can't achieve my goal, whatever it is, the motivation runs out. The days I play best are when I have undivided conviction that I will get there. Example there is a course I play so short and easy I expect to break 80 every time I am there. Not a huge accomplishment because the rating is so low a 78 means shooting my handicap. Anyway if I turn at +5 I am hosed unless I play the back really clean and then some. All it takes is one double and a few bogeys and I am past the point of no return. The last couple holes I don't care because no matter what happens it will fall outside my 10 best.

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I suppose I have to start from scratch learn how to play as I go each day because I almost always shoot better scores as I go along.

If I play 18 the second nine is the best and if I play 36 the third nine is better than the second and the fourth is better than the third.

P.S. If I play 2 days in a row I'm always better the second day.

I seem incapable of remembering how to play from the start. :surrender:

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Depends on the speed of the round - if i see the cart girl a 3rd time before 18, my ball striking can tend to be a bit off

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Honestly usually disappointment. Once I've gotten to the point where I am certain I can't achieve my goal, whatever it is, the motivation runs out. The days I play best are when I have undivided conviction that I will get there. Example there is a course I play so short and easy I expect to break 80 every time I am there. Not a huge accomplishment because the rating is so low a 78 means shooting my handicap. Anyway if I turn at +5 I am hosed unless I play the back really clean and then some. All it takes is one double and a few bogeys and I am past the point of no return. The last couple holes I don't care because no matter what happens it will fall outside my 10 best.

That is my biggest problem, a few blow up holes early can make a round really painful, especially by the end, when I'm hot, tired and sweaty.  I am considering suggesting we play for some friendly wager to help keep me interested in a round where I'm not going to meet my personal expectations.

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Driving accuracy. And it doesn't help that the two tightest driving holes on the course are Nos. 15 and 16.

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I usually start off bad and get better as the round goes on.

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Just kind of wondering when you get tired (either physically or mentally) what part of your game breaks down?

Nothing.

My bad rounds (or good rounds) have no order to them.  I am just as likely to start off bogey-double-bogey then turn it around and finish with a 79, as I am to shoot a bunch of pars and blow it at the end with sloppy play.

Golf isn't physical enough (even for an out of shape slob like myself) to lead to breakdowns due to fatigue.

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When I played a bunch, and I'm talkin at least 4 times a week. On about the 13th, or 14th hole, my back started hurting so bad, most times I had to stop playing. On the longer, and more $$$$ courses I stuck it out, but played like poo poo..Never got tired, or anything, just having my back hurt.

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My bad stretches can and do pop up anywhere in a round. That said, I'd say my decision making process probably falters and I'll hit the wrong club. I may try to get too cute with a shot or rush the process a little.

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I start off slow, then fizzle out all together ...

Actually I stop transferring weight to my left forward and keeping my head down ... effects all clubs ...

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Nothing.

My bad rounds (or good rounds) have no order to them.  I am just as likely to start off bogey-double-bogey then turn it around and finish with a 79, as I am to shoot a bunch of pars and blow it at the end with sloppy play.

Golf isn't physical enough (even for an out of shape slob like myself) to lead to breakdowns due to fatigue.

It seems like stuff that requires finesse has some potential to lose out when you are tired.

Do you drive a cart or walk? If you walk do you push/pull or carry? I'm wondering if carrying a bag around makes any difference.

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It seems like stuff that requires finesse has some potential to lose out when you are tired.

Do you drive a cart or walk? If you walk do you push/pull or carry? I'm wondering if carrying a bag around makes any difference.

Ya know.. Golfnow rounds always came with a cart in Denver so I never walked a round until just last week when I moved to Idaho.  I thought I would be exhausted and play terrible but surprisingly that hasn't been the case.  I've walked and carried my bag 3 rounds here so far and I think it actually makes me play a little better since I'm not able to cruise up to the ball and hit shot after shot without relaxing or thinking.

Someone mentioned that this might be beneficial in another thread and from what I can tell so far it seems to be true.

Anyway, carry on!

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Ya know.. Golfnow rounds always came with a cart in Denver so I never walked a round until just last week when I moved to Idaho.  I thought I would be exhausted and play terrible but surprisingly that hasn't been the case.  I've walked and carried my bag 3 rounds here so far and I think it actually makes me play a little better since I'm not able to cruise up to the ball and hit shot after shot without relaxing or thinking.

Someone mentioned that this might be beneficial in another thread and from what I can tell so far it seems to be true.

Anyway, carry on!


I like to carry in casual rounds as well, but I can't pass up a free cart either.

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Putting. I never make anything at the end when I'm tired. I leave a lot short.
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Putting. I never make anything at the end when I'm tired. I leave a lot short.

I noticed that on one or two rounds that I left them short or made a complete misread. I can't complain with 33 putts on my last round, but more of them occurred on the back 9 according to the data in Golflogix.

This is part of the reason why I brought up this thread, because the trend really surprised me. Although I "felt" no different from the front to the back, the data shows otherwise. Mental analysis of the data shows some signs of deterioration of my drives and accuracy, approaches, pitches, chips and putting throughout the round.

The plan is to start using all the features in the SW to see if there is a trend in all my rounds. It's going to take a few rounds learning how to use the tool effectively, but I think it's worth it to find little trends including hole by hole stats on multiple rounds. Plus, there is a data export feature in the SW that needs to be explored. BTW, I am not endorsing this SW, but it seems to be pretty comprehensive.

Are any other people who keep detailed front and back 9 stats, or even keep them with this SW?

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