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1 minute ago, Cantankerish said:

The pitching wedge now goes about 140-145 (up from 120-125) while the gap wedge (50 degree) goes about 115, up from 100-105. 

If what you say is true, that's pretty poor gapping.  PW 140-45 then about GW 115 is not a good gap.

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On 7/5/2019 at 3:44 PM, ncates00 said:

If what you say is true, that's pretty poor gapping.  PW 140-45 then about GW 115 is not a good gap.

It is not good gapping.  This topic continues to poke at me.  I still have the same clubs and distances.  I still struggle some on the 125 yard strokes because I am not proficient at hitting clubs at partial strength.  That is something I would like to work on.  I have a question for the folks who prefer to take something off the pitching wedge rather than choosing a shorter club.

Do you do this because the high lofted clubs are so hard to hit properly compared to, say, a 75% pitching wedge?  Is there some other kind of advantage to selecting a shot like this?

 

I have been thinking about tackling that skill, but I am not sure if it important (compared to the other skills I would like to acquire) if I have command of the wedges such a shot would compete with.

Edited by Cantankerish

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37 minutes ago, Cantankerish said:

Do you do this because the high lofted clubs are so hard to hit properly compared to, say, a 75% pitching wedge?  Is there some other kind of advantage to selecting a shot like this?

It's very important to have and know different distances for each of your short iron shots.   Search here for flighting your wedges.  a 75% (3/4) swing is a must learn shot (really good to have) for all of your wedges.

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On 2/7/2019 at 11:19 AM, Cantankerish said:

Good day, all.  I have buckets of questions, but this one comes up consistently in my game:

I don't really have a good tool for the 100 yard shot.  And it comes up all the time.

Currently dealing with this issue and it's kinda driving me nuts because I feel like going to my range and hitting balls at/around the 100 yard flag is not doing me much good. Right now all I have is my PW and it's the tool I use from about 130 yards out for everything from full swings to green side short game work. My biggest weakness is the 3/4 or 1/2 swing PW...so if I had to guess that's anything from like 80-120 yards or something.

For me anything under or around 80 yards is just a simple walk up to and hit to get it up on the green but then anything more than that up to around a full swing I'm just dropping the ball big time in this department and I'm finding myself in this territory on basically every par 4 except for longer ones or par 5s.

Right now I'd rather hit a 5 iron into a green than a 3/4 PW!

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48 minutes ago, Cantankerish said:

It is not good gapping.  This topic continues to poke at me.  I still have the same clubs and distances.  I still struggle some on the 125 yard strokes because I am not proficient at hitting clubs at partial strength.  That is something I would like to work on.  I have a question for the folks who prefer to take something off the pitching wedge rather than choosing a shorter club.

Do you do this because the high lofted clubs are so hard to hit properly compared to, say, a 75% pitching wedge?  Is there some other kind of advantage to selecting a shot like this?

 

A “100% swing”, need not be “as hard as you can swing”.  I’d argue that it shouldn’t be.

Yes, higher lofted clubs can be more difficult for players, especially those a bit less skilled to strike consistently.  So a smoother swing can be more consistent and also allows for a certain amount of “adjustment” for conditions.  80% can easily become 85% to account for a bit of breeze, or elevation as an example, while hitting everything at max get-it only allows the option of changing to another club.  You hit your putter with varying firmness to account for distance.  You do the same for many greenside chips and pitches.  It’s no less important to learn to do the same with other clubs, especially your wedges.

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34 minutes ago, ShawnSum said:

Currently dealing with this issue and it's kinda driving me nuts because I feel like going to my range and hitting balls at/around the 100 yard flag is not doing me much good. Right now all I have is my PW and it's the tool I use from about 130 yards out for everything from full swings to green side short game work. My biggest weakness is the 3/4 or 1/2 swing PW...so if I had to guess that's anything from like 80-120 yards or something.

For me anything under or around 80 yards is just a simple walk up to and hit to get it up on the green but then anything more than that up to around a full swing I'm just dropping the ball big time in this department and I'm finding myself in this territory on basically every par 4 except for longer ones or par 5s.

Right now I'd rather hit a 5 iron into a green than a 3/4 PW!

Here's a really good article on learning to hit partial wedges.

Notice that the recommendation is NOT to learn to hit your PW 100 yards when a full swing is 130.  Learn by feel FIRST, take what feels like a 3/4 swing and see how far it goes.  Do the same with what feels like a 1/2 swing.  Once you learn that a 3/4 swing goes 110, a 1/2 swing goes 80, you know you have just under a 3/4 swing to hit it 100.

The other important thing, to me, is that you're not trying to swing slower or faster, you want the same mechanics and sequencing for all of these shots.  You'll vary the distance by varying the length of your backswing.

If possible, its great to get these yardages in an open field, but you can probably do something similar on the range.  Yes, you won't be as exact when you're trying to estimate how far you hit it, but you'll have a better feel for partial swings than you do right now.

And if you currently don't have a wedge shorter than your PW, you might consider changing the make-up of your bag.  I'm the last one to recommend buying equipment, but in your case it might be useful.

The very last thing, for now, is to mention that this same instructional post was linked on the first page of this thread.  If you didn't already, I always recommend that you read the entire thread before responding to the initial post.

Edited by DaveP043

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8 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

Here's a really good article on learning to hit partial wedges.

Notice that the recommendation is NOT to learn to hit your PW 100 yards when a full swing is 130.  Learn by feel FIRST, take what feels like a 3/4 swing and see how far it goes.  Do the same with what feels like a 1/2 swing.  Once you learn that a 3/4 swing goes 110, a 1/2 swing goes 80, you know you have just under a 3/4 swing to hit it 100.

The other important thing, to me, is that you're not trying to swing slower or faster, you want the same mechanics and sequencing for all of these shots.  You'll vary the distance by varying the length of your backswing.

If possible, its great to get these yardages in an open field, but you can probably do something similar on the range.  Yes, you won't be as exact when you're trying to estimate how far you hit it, but you'll have a better feel for partial swings than you do right now.

And if you currently don't have a wedge shorter than your PW, you might consider changing the make-up of your bag.  I'm the last one to recommend buying equipment, but in your case it might be useful.

Thanks I'll give that a read and practice the different backswings next time I'm on the range, and yeah I definitely need to round out the bag! Got 4 more slots I can fill in the bag!

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3 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

Here's a really good article on learning to hit partial wedges.

Notice that the recommendation is NOT to learn to hit your PW 100 yards when a full swing is 130.  Learn by feel FIRST, take what feels like a 3/4 swing and see how far it goes.  Do the same with what feels like a 1/2 swing.  Once you learn that a 3/4 swing goes 110, a 1/2 swing goes 80, you know you have just under a 3/4 swing to hit it 100.

The other important thing, to me, is that you're not trying to swing slower or faster, you want the same mechanics and sequencing for all of these shots.  You'll vary the distance by varying the length of your backswing.

If possible, its great to get these yardages in an open field, but you can probably do something similar on the range.  Yes, you won't be as exact when you're trying to estimate how far you hit it, but you'll have a better feel for partial swings than you do right now.

And if you currently don't have a wedge shorter than your PW, you might consider changing the make-up of your bag.  I'm the last one to recommend buying equipment, but in your case it might be useful.

Your advice brings me back to my youth and playing golf with my Dad.  My game was progressing and I was stuck staring at a shot into the green.  I looked at my Dad and I told him I had no idea what to do.  If I swung my PW full I was going to be long.

He smiled and then began the best lesson I have ever had in hitting a wedge.  He taught me to choke down and swing normal.  He would hit the shot and I would watch, then I hit the shot.  We went back and forth.  I would watch him and then I would do it.  That was our version of video taping golf.  Learn by example, watch and then do.

After I learned the choke down wedge he move us in and then we worked on 3/4 swing and 1/2 swing wedge shots.  Back in the 1970's the PW was the lowest lofted club in the bag, at least what I was allowed to have and by necessity you had to learn how to hit all different types of wedge shots.

While I have lost the "art" of the choke down wedge today I still practice 1/2 and 3/4 wedges.  it is amazing how often I will hit a 3/4 52* wedge in stead of a full swing 56* wedge.  Or even a 1/2 swing 52* over a 60* full or 3/4 56*.  

Thanks again @DaveP043 for bringing me back to my youth and learning this wonderful game with my Dad.  Your brought a big smile to my face.

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Knockdown shots have helped me in the last week a lot. My pw goes 100 yards on the range but i never seem to get that on the course, so I will hit a soft 9 iron from this range. I think that the not full power shot is the way to go because it seems to be more controllable (at least for me)

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8 hours ago, Cantankerish said:

This topic continues to poke at me.  I still have the same clubs and distances.  I still struggle some on the 125 yard strokes because I am not proficient at hitting clubs at partial strength.

This is probably a good video for you:

 

8 hours ago, Cantankerish said:

Do you do this because the high lofted clubs are so hard to hit properly compared to, say, a 75% pitching wedge?  Is there some other kind of advantage to selecting a shot like this?

The main reason is better control, both over the club and the trajectory, which usually means more accuracy.

You're more likely to hit your intended line with a shorter swing. You'll hit the ball lower so it won't be affected by the wind as much. Contact will likely be better with a shorter swing.

8 hours ago, Cantankerish said:

I have been thinking about tackling that skill, but I am not sure if it important (compared to the other skills I would like to acquire) if I have command of the wedges such a shot would compete with.

It's really not that complicated. If you have a full swing, you have partial swings. It's just a matter of gaining awareness and getting confidence in using it.

Think about it this way: you have a 30' putt and then a 3' putt. Do you stand over the 3 footer and wonder what mechanics you need to change from your 30 footer to hit it?

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On 2/7/2019 at 11:19 AM, Cantankerish said:

Good day, all.  I have buckets of questions, but this one comes up consistently in my game:

I don't really have a good tool for the 100 yard shot.  And it comes up all the time.

My first method was to lay off the pitching wedge.  I hit it about 130 yards on a pretty good stroke. Then I got myself a gap wedge.  Note: my budget is pretty tight, so I picked up a used one.  It is peculiarly short, 52 degree loft.  I like the club, but it only hits about 85-90 yards for me.  That is similar to what my sand wedge hits, so I do not have a club for this distance.  I am not entirely unsatisfied with the 75% pitching wedge shot.  It kinda works.  I now have a 4 hybrid in the bag to fill my 180-190 yard range which also comes up frequently - and for which I have no such workaround.

 

Is it common practice for golfers to face this issue?  Is there a known best option?

Is the club length a major issue here? Perhaps I have been hitting the club wrong so as not to get proper distance.  I wonder if it is worth getting another gap wedge to find out, but then I have to remove another club.

(Everything in golf makes me nervous.  There is so much to learn, and it is not clear to me when to follow my gut and when to take instruction.)

There's a lot of good advice on this topic. But my father's approach wasn't mentioned yet. What my dad does is carry like 20 clubs. That way he always has the club he needs for whatever circumstances arise. I've often told him that you are only allowed 14 clubs. To which he replies "Oh, that's a bullshit rule." 

How can you argue with that?

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11 hours ago, Cantankerish said:

It is not good gapping.  This topic continues to poke at me.  I still have the same clubs and distances.  I still struggle some on the 125 yard strokes because I am not proficient at hitting clubs at partial strength.  That is something I would like to work on.  I have a question for the folks who prefer to take something off the pitching wedge rather than choosing a shorter club.

Do you do this because the high lofted clubs are so hard to hit properly compared to, say, a 75% pitching wedge?  Is there some other kind of advantage to selecting a shot like this?

 

I have been thinking about tackling that skill, but I am not sure if it important (compared to the other skills I would like to acquire) if I have command of the wedges such a shot would compete with.

I carry my PW about 120-125 (range balls actually go farther), and it tends to stay within a few feet. If I hit my 56 with the ball at the back of my stance it can go up to 100 or so reliably with a light wind at my back.

So, if I have a gust of wind in my face, I’ll hit a PW and will fly about 100-ish. Wind at my back, 56 goes 100 or more-ish. Of course, my PW is a 47-48 degree blade.

I really try not to use partial shots unless I’m inside 100 yards? It’s not like at my skill level I can control an 8i to go 100 yards then 120 yards on command when it’s my 145 carry club with a full swing? Too far to try something like that.

That said...on 5800-6300 yard courses, I end up 100 yards only about 1-2 times a round at most, playing any of the 8 to 10 courses I frequent. I’m very often between 125 and 170 if I can use my driver, and sometimes near the green on short holes. PW to 6i work really well most of the time. Wind at my back or front is one or two clubs up or down. Obviously, teeing off with 3W or hybrid adds 20 or 40 yards to the approach. So, 3i sometimes, and as rarely as my 56.

I’d recommend this more simple strategy for people like us. An up and down from 10 to 20 yards isn’t too bad as long as you’re not in deep trouble.

The other thing might be to get more wedges. 

Edited by Lihu

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19 minutes ago, Lihu said:

That said...on 5800-6300 yard courses, I end up 100 yards only about 1-2 times a round at most, playing any of the 8 to 10 courses I frequent. I’m very often between 125 and 170 if I can use my driver, and sometimes near the green on short holes. PW to 6i work really well most of the time. Wind at my back or front is one or two clubs up or down. Obviously, teeing off with 3W or hybrid adds 20 or 40 yards to the approach. So, 3i sometimes, and as rarely as my 56.

I’d recommend this more simple strategy for people like us. An up and down from 10 to 20 yards isn’t too bad as long as you’re not in deep trouble.

I'm not sure I'm understanding what you are saying here. Are you suggesting you hit 3W or hybrid or even 3 iron off the tee so that you can avoid ending up 100 yards out? Preferring instead to be 125 to 170 yards out?

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A skulled sand wedge is a go-to shot for me.  The trick is to look up before you make contact.  A month ago I carded an eagle using just that technique.  

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4 hours ago, ChetlovesMer said:

I'm not sure I'm understanding what you are saying here. Are you suggesting you hit 3W or hybrid or even 3 iron off the tee so that you can avoid ending up 100 yards out? Preferring instead to be 125 to 170 yards out?

Not at all. Why would I do that?

I’m just noting that I don’t always tee off with a driver so the distances might vary on my approaches...

3 hours ago, Piz said:

A skulled sand wedge is a go-to shot for me.  The trick is to look up before you make contact.  A month ago I carded an eagle using just that technique.  

👍

Hey, an Eagle is hard enough to get...

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8 hours ago, Lihu said:

Not at all. Why would I do that?

I’m just noting that I don’t always tee off with a driver so the distances might vary on my approaches...

I get it. I didn't quite understand when I read your post. All good, thanks for the clarification. 

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11 hours ago, Piz said:

A skulled sand wedge is a go-to shot for me.  The trick is to look up before you make contact.  A month ago I carded an eagle using just that technique.  

You’ve gotta have all the shots if you’re gonna play this game!  :beer:

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On 9/23/2019 at 5:41 PM, billchao said:

This is probably a good video for you:

 

The main reason is better control, both over the club and the trajectory, which usually means more accuracy.

You're more likely to hit your intended line with a shorter swing. You'll hit the ball lower so it won't be affected by the wind as much. Contact will likely be better with a shorter swing.

It's really not that complicated. If you have a full swing, you have partial swings. It's just a matter of gaining awareness and getting confidence in using it.

Think about it this way: you have a 30' putt and then a 3' putt. Do you stand over the 3 footer and wonder what mechanics you need to change from your 30 footer to hit it?

This advice has been so helpful.  I had no appreciation for the value of practicing partial strokes so much.  I started at the range today.  Got a lot of work to do.  🙂

 

Note: Those guys would have been more helpful if they did not spend their time denigrating the people they made the video to teach.

Edited by Cantankerish

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