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TallSouthern

Driving Range Etiquette

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16 minutes ago, jetsknicks1 said:

I gotta disagree with this. I mean you're on the range, it's not like you're on the tee box getting ready to play. If I'm on the range with a buddy and we're hitting next to each other, we're gonna talk. The range is a much more casual situation, I don't see how two people having a conversation would interfere with anybody else on the range.

It's natural to have some disagreement in this topic because there are two basic types of people. Some golfers thrive while chatting and such while others need a quiet environment. It's just like in college where some students study well with others while chatting and socializing, while others like a private room with complete quiet.

I tend to fall into the talk over three people with my range buddies type, but I also walk over to them to talk and quiet down when I see someone is not happy with that. The most boring range sessions are the ones where no one is talking and everyone is super serious. I get soooo bored. So, I find ranges in my area where people chat freely.

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32 minutes ago, Lihu said:

It's natural to have some disagreement in this topic because there are two basic types of people. Some golfers thrive while chatting and such while others need a quiet environment. It's just like in college where some students study well with others while chatting and socializing, while others like a private room with complete quiet.

I agree with this. A "quiet end" of the driving range would be great for me. When I was in college I never could understand those people who could watch TV and do homework, or listen to music while they study.. I always needed to be in the quiet part of the library to get anything done. 

 

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I've never seen the type of behaviour @TallSouthern describes.  I'm usually at the range in the early morning and folks tend to be quiet and focusing on the task at hand...  I suggest the early morning if you want a quiet range experience.

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Only two things that bother me at the driving range. Hitting too many balls and hitting range balls that are so wore out that they fly a cork screws trajectory. I live in a beach community.  A lot of people practice hitting, and actually play 18 holes barefoot. One of the regular's was an old surfing pro. He plays scratch golf barefoot, but always wears nice golf attire. 

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I can see what the OP is getting at. When I hit balls I always go to the far right or left to get away from other people best I can. When I am on the range I have specific things to work on, and I don't especially care to hear the babblings of the person next to me. That being said having a conversation in normal tones on the range I would not consider to be rude. 

Thankfully, the course where I work has a private practice area at the other end of the range to give lessons and employees to work on your game so I go there 90% of the time. Nice and peaceful and I don't have to fight with the 7 other people chipping on whose ball is whose. ;-)

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On 10/19/2017 at 11:22 AM, Midpack said:

You're only on the range for an hour or less,

Or six.:whistle:

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7 hours ago, jetsknicks1 said:

I gotta disagree with this. I mean you're on the range, it's not like you're on the tee box getting ready to play. If I'm on the range with a buddy and we're hitting next to each other, we're gonna talk. The range is a much more casual situation, I don't see how two people having a conversation would interfere with anybody else on the range.

Different strokes for different folks I guess.  I don't mind a little chit-chat, but do object to extended conversations. 

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On 10/18/2017 at 9:56 PM, colin007 said:

 I think that perhaps the only driving range etiquette rule that really exists is don't give unsolicited advice. If you're putting people down for dressing "trashy" on a driving range then you might want to get off your lofty means of transportation.

You read my mind! This might be the only real rule of range etiquette other than if an attractive lady golfer shows up, don't stare at her and make her uncomfortable. I've hit the range in all manner of dress. Dressed for the course, and just after cutting the grass all sweaty and nasty! Generally nobody gives a crap!

On 10/19/2017 at 10:12 AM, Lihu said:

 

However, I will say that there is a marked amount of "outdrivesmanship" going on at many ranges. One person hits a driver, and sometimes their neighbor(s) pull out driver and every time they change clubs the other ones will follow suit and you hear a lot of grunting. Other than that, never seen any animosity at all.

You got that right! I actually witnessed this at the U.S. Open at Oakmont in 1973! It was between Tom Weiskopf and Jack Nicklaus on the practice tee before round 3!

And Tall Southern, you gave the answer to their behavior in one of your replies. They were drunk! What other reason do you need to explain poor behavior?

Edited by Buckeyebowman

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Some of the examples above are the reason I usually hit the range with sunglasses and an earbuds. I do NOT want to see or hear anyone else - just too much distraction.

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No phone calls, please.

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On 10/21/2017 at 5:40 PM, Buckeyebowman said:

You read my mind! This might be the only real rule of range etiquette other than if an attractive lady golfer shows up, don't stare at her and make her uncomfortable.

I'm pretty sure that one is not just for the driving range, this applies in all public situations. Don't be a creeper! :-P

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A friend of mine calls that the "top golf" effect. But i think loud groups of people who dont care much for golf itself but are out on a range hitting balls is nothing new. It doesn't bother me, but i does others. I come across a situation like that so infrequently that its not worth getting steamed up about it. Confronting them doesn't change anything and is more of a waste of your time than it is the other people. 

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You will always find non golfers at a driving range just blasting balls... sometimes a lil drunk, sometimes in a big group trying to out hit each other, etc.  Deal with it, come earlier in the day or find a new/private spot.

I was lucky as the place I use to go to had a public end for anyone to go to and then a private area that you had to join up to be able to use.  The private area was great as nobody bothered you at all.  I could hit a small bucket, then go to the chipping area and chip 120 balls and then hit the putting area and never see a single person or hear any noise.

I miss that place.

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I don't care what others do or how they dress at the range. I might hate on them just for fun but that has nothing to do with the range per se. Seriously though, when I'm on the range I'm typically too focused on my own game to care about those things. I often have earphones to drown out chatter.

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The only driving range encounter that legitimately pissed me off was having a guy next to me ask for some of my range balls after his were gone.  A polite or courteous ask wouldn't have bothered me, but that wasn't the case.  As I was working on a drill (with earbuds in listening to music), I heard this guy going "Hey Jimmy...Johnny?  Steve?  Mike!?" getting progressively louder with each name trying to get my attention by guessing my name I suppose.  I finally gave him a "What's up?" nod, and he asks if he can have one of my balls to "end on a good one."  Rude?  Yes.  Big deal?  Not really, so I chip one over to him...naturally he flubs it.  Then he turns right back around and says "Hey buddy let me try another one."  No chance, dude...I just mockingly laughed, telling him the previous ball is well within walking distance and to go get that one if he needs another swing.  On the way home (in a true George Costanza moment) I wished I would have just silently walked to that flubbed ball and chipped it back to him haha.

Swing advice, noise, etc doesn't bother me on the range, however I never have time for blatantly rude people.

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On 10/23/2017 at 1:07 PM, NM Golf said:

I'm pretty sure that one is not just for the driving range, this applies in all public situations. Don't be a creeper! :-P

Disagree.  What's wrong with checking out an attractive woman?

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On the range, I could give a hoot who’s there and who’s not.  However on the course if I’m paired up, I’m the consummate gentleman golfer.  

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